Hot prowl burglary (in other varieties of English)

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blasita

Senior Member
Spain. Left seven years ago
Hello everyone.

Definition of hot prowl burglary:
noun
US: a burglary that takes place while the occupants are in the building.
A string of hot prowl burglaries are occurring in San Diego Country Estates, and Detective Tom Seiver with the sheriff’s Ramona station advises residents to lock their doors. Macmillan Open Dictionary.
Apparently it's a US term. I am trying to find the British one, and especially a term that will be understood everywhere (if possible)

Thank you.
 
  • blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    Thank you very much, Copyright.

    It's actually the only term that I've been able to find.:( What term would you use to express that idea (crime) then, please?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't have a term, even though it's happened to me. :) I call it a robbery while I'm at home, or, more accurately, a robbery while I was asleep. And then I bore everyone with the details. :D
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I have heard "creeping" an apartment or home used to describe a stealthy burglary while the homeowner is present. (AE) I think I may have read this in an Elmore Leonard MAS (mystery/action/suspense) book. He's pretty good on jargon and argot in his stories.

    Try some searches on creep/creeping with home, apartment, pad, place and other names for a dwelling to see if this gets any hits.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Macmillan's Open Dictionary is a bit like Urban Dictionary. The words are user-submitted and it doesn't have the same standards for admitting words as most dictionaries. It's also amusing that this "US:" entry says "Submitted from United Kingdom on 30/08/2012 15:50:00."
    I haven't heard the term before, it doesn't make sense to me, and I think the definition applies to a lot of burglaries so I'm unclear why there would suddenly need to be a word for it.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    OK, many thanks again, Copyright.

    And thanks a lot for your help, Pwmeek.

    Thank you for your reply, Myridon. Maybe it's too formal and only used in certain/legal contexts (I don't think so) or a mistake and it's a British term; I really don't know. What I know now is that it's not common. And yes, I need to use this term in a text.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I don't think it's a BrE term either, blasita. I've never heard it - indeed, I've never heard any specific term for this type of burglary.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    Thank you very much, Loob and Sound. Then I think I'll use kind of a short explanation to be on the safe side.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I don't think it's a BrE term either, blasita. I've never heard it - indeed, I've never heard any specific term for this type of burglary.
    Me neither, though it's happened to me too (and I was fully awake and 100% sober).

    I can't think of a way of naming it that doesn't involve fewer than about 10 words:(
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Under Illinois law, a burglary where the defendant knows that someone is home is one example of a home invasion (a separate crime). There's no particular phrase for a burglary when people just happen to be home, though. I've never heard the phrase in the OP before (in my 24 years of being a prosecutor).
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    Thanks a lot, Ewie. If you can think of something shorter, please let us know.:)

    Thank you, JustKate. I have no idea; maybe hot means dangerous​ here?

    That's very interesting, Pob. Thank you.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I see there are a number of google hits for pob's "home invasion". It doesn't work for me, though - I would have no idea what it meant:(.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    Somewhere I picked up that a "hot prowl" was police slang for a burglary taking place while the residents are present. "Hot" could indicate something dangerous, but couldn't it als indicate something taking place right now, like in "hot pursuit"? Like in "hey, finish your donut. We got a code one for a hot prowl down at Seventh Avenue", or something like that.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I know what a home invasion is (thanks to the TV show Criminal Minds - not real life), but it doesn't really fit this scenario. For one thing, it usually involves more than just burglary, and for another it is, as POB describes, done deliberately while the occupants are there.
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    [...]Thank you, JustKate. I have no idea; maybe hot means dangerous​ here?[...]
    I suspect that it means more like "active", meaning that the premises are active (people present, even if asleep or in another part of the house) rather than static (people not present). An electrical wire is said to be "hot" if electricity is present.

    If Elmore Leonard is to be believed, some criminals choose to enter homes where people are sleeping just for the added thrill.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    Thank you again, Pwmeek. Yes, that makes sense!

    I thought of 'dangerous' just because of the situation (i.e. a robbery that occurs when the occupants are inside the premises/home/building/dwelling is much more 'dangerous' -and so considered aggravating circumstances).

    By the way, I found what Copyright and Ewie said terrifying. We always keep the alarm on at night, but well, you never know.

    I'm trying to translate some legal terms not from Spanish but from another language into others, and there's actually a specific term for it in that language. I think that I'll use what I said above. Thanks everyone.
     
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