...hotels frequented by foreigners < Is it a past or passive >

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Hi everybody,
Which tense is what I underlined in this sentence "After a weekend of violence and fear, U.S. officials warned Sunday that luxury hotels frequented by foreigners and Nigeria's elite may be bombed by a radical Muslim sect as the death toll from attacks in the country's northeast rose to more than 100."?


Any comments will be highly appreciated.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The phrase 'frequented by foreigners' does not contain a finite verb, so does not have tense the way finite forms of the verb such as 'he frequents' and 'you frequented' have a tense.
     
    The phrase 'frequented by foreigners' does not contain a finite verb, so does not have tense the way finite forms of the verb such as 'he frequents' and 'you frequented' have a tense.
    Thank you so much indeed, because "luxury hotels frequented by foreigners",luxury hotels is a subject, and " by foreigners" is agent> ,then which part of speech is "'frequented" in that sentence?
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I would call it an adjective. It could be rephrased as "...luxury hotels visited by foreigners..."

    The base structure of the sentence is "...Luxury hotels (descriptive phrase) may be bombed..."
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    [..."luxury hotels frequented by foreigners and Nigeria's elite may....QUOTE/a cooperator]

    "frequented" is the past participle of "to frequent", a non-finite verb form.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In this Wikipedia article it describes this particular use of a non-finite verb as a reduced adjective clause and gives the following example:

    The reduced adjective clause can be formed even if the present participle is not used as a predicate in the clause.[3]

    The students who were fidgeting in their seats were anxious about the test.
    The students who fidgeted in their seats were anxious about the test.
    The students fidgeting in their seats were anxious about the test.
     

    Resa Reader

    Senior Member
    In this Wikipedia article it describes this particular use of a non-finite verb as a reduced adjective clause and gives the following example:

    The reduced adjective clause can be formed even if the present participle is not used as a predicate in the clause.[3]

    The students who were fidgeting in their seats were anxious about the test.
    The students who fidgeted in their seats were anxious about the test.
    The students fidgeting in their seats were anxious about the test.
    I'd call it a 'reduced relative clause'. What remains is the 'participle' (be it a 'present participle' as in James' examples or a 'past particle' as in your sentence, a cooperator) that is then used as an adjective.

    "....... luxury hotel frequented by foreigners ..." = luxury hotels [that are] frequented by foreigners

    As was pointed out above you can't talk of "tense" here.
     
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