How a data detective exposed suspicious medical trials

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Why use past tense "exposed"? The data detective routinely does his "detective" job, so the exposing would most likely continue.

The question of this thread is: Does "How a data detective exposes suspicious medical trials" as headlne work too?
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How a data detective exposed suspicious medical trials
Anaesthetist John Carlisle has spotted problems in hundreds of research papers — and spurred a leading medical journal to change its practice.
Anaesthetist John Carlisle works in a hospital in Torquay, UK, and in his spare time finds statistical errors in medical research trials.



Source: 23 JULY 2019
How a data detective exposed suspicious medical trials
 
  • Skatinginbc

    Senior Member
    Mandarin 國語
    How a data detective exposed suspicious medical trials:
    he explains how he began to look for faked data in medical research.
    More than ten years ago, Carlisle and other anaesthesiologists began chattering about results published by a Japanese researcher, Yoshitaka Fujii. In a series of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), Fujii, who then worked at Toho University in Tokyo, claimed to have examined the impact of various medicines on preventing vomiting and nausea in patients after surgery. But the data looked too clean to be true...
    He was telling a story that happened in the past.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Thank you.:)

    He was telling a story that happened in the past.
    Have you read the beginning of the report?:

    If John Carlisle had a cat flap, scientific fraudsters might rest easier at night. Carlisle routinely rises at 4.30 a.m. to let out Wizard, the family pet. Then, unable to sleep, he reaches for his laptop and starts typing up data from published papers on clinical trials.
    Data sleuthing is part of his life everyday: Began yesterday, continues today and tomorrow.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Skatingbc is entirely correct. Although either headline could be used, the article refers to past events. Dr Carlisle has exposed suspicious medical trials. There is no way of knowing if he is currently exposing suspicious trials; all we know about his current activity is that he is looking at studies. They may or may not be fraudulent, but that can only ever be known after he has completed his looking. All of his exposures are historical events, and correctly framed in the past.
     

    Skatinginbc

    Senior Member
    Mandarin 國語
    Have you read the beginning of the report?
    Yes. What immediately follows the title "How a data detective exposed suspicious medical trials" is the thesis statement (i.e., one sentence that expresses the main idea of an essay): "Anaesthetist John Carlisle has spotted problems in hundreds of research papers and spurred a leading medical journal to change its practice." The word "exposed" (past tense) leads readers to assume that the meat of the article would be about something that has happened, and the assumption is immediately supported and reinforced by the article's thesis statement.

    If a writer intends to explore common sleuthing techniques employed by distinguished data detectives (plural) through an interview series, then the title "How a data detective exposes (present tense) suspicious medical trials" may fit the bill.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    How a data detective exposed suspicious medical trials
    This reports only his successes of the past. We don't know that he is always successful; we don't know if he is currently in the process of exposing a fraud/mistake and we don't know that he will ever expose another fraud/mistake for the rest of his life. That's why it is in the past.
     
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