How do dogs bark?

Boljon

Senior Member
Chinese
It'll be fun if we compare the onomatopoeic words for the barking of dogs in different languages.

ATTENTION: NOT the verb like "to bark", but the ONOMATOPOEIA like "bowwow".

Chinese: Wang1 Wang1
Japanese: Wang Wang
Korean: Meong Meong
 
  • Zsanna

    ModErrata
    Hungarian - Hungary
    In Hungarian: vau vau.

    I thought in English it was woof, woof...
    It also seems to me as if there was something like "bow wow", is that right?
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    In German it's 'wau wau' - and smaller children, too, like to refer to the dog as 'der Wauwau'.

    This, phonetically, is very close to Italian 'bau bau', Arab ''aw 'aw' and others - the different phonetics and spellings of the different languages obscure, to a degree, similarities.
     

    Nizo

    Senior Member
    In Esperanto dogs usually say either, "ŭa! ŭa!" or "boj! boj!" Of course, there aren't a lot of Esperanto-speaking dogs around :) There are Milu', who is Tinĉjo's little partner, and Snufiks, loyal companion of Asteriks...
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    It'll be fun if we compare the onomatopoeic words for the barking of dogs in different languages.

    ATTENTION: NOT the verb like "to bark", but the ONOMATOPOEIA like "bowwow".

    Chinese: Wang1 Wang1
    Japanese: Wang Wang
    Korean: Meong Meong
    Japanese corrected by my humble person to ワン ワン[wan wan]
    By the way, how to say the verb like "to bark" itself (if it isn't offtopic)?
    In Czech: štěkat
    In Lithuanian: amsėti, loti[lo:ti]...
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In Hungarian: vau vau.

    I thought in English it was woof, woof...
    It also seems to me as if there was something like "bow wow", is that right?
    You're right. It's "bow wow" and "woof woof".
    I have never heard of "Roof Roof".
     

    elephas

    Member
    USA, Russian, English
    Russian: gav-gav (гав-гав), there is also the verb "gavkat'" (гавкать) which is emotionally charged along with more polite-neutral "layat" (лаять). For small lap dogs, it's "tyaff-tyaff" (тяф-тяф) with corresponding verb form "tafkat" (тявкать, тяфкать). All those forms can be used as derogatory for human talk to put someone down, as a comeback in a fight.

    "А ну не тяфкать!" === "shut up!"
    heard from a Russian drill sergeant: "Взвод закроет пасть или будет дальше гавкать?" - "You men is gonna keep yapping or shut your mothtraps up?"
     

    Zsanna

    ModErrata
    Hungarian - Hungary
    Thank you, Qcumber to have answered my question. I've never heard of "roof roof" either but it's interesting that there is apparently an American "version" of it (N°27).
    Now I'm really curious if in Scotland or Wales there is also "special" version...
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    "To bark", in Persian, is "paars kardan" I'm not positive on this, but I think "woof-woof" translates to "wow-wow" in Persian.

    Also, "haapu" is the word Persian-speaking kids use for "doggie"
     

    zalacain56

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    As far as I know, in czech is also "Baf baf" but maybe the spelling is "Vaf, vaf". I'm not sure, but that said to me my teacher of czech (she is czech).
     

    Miguel Antonio

    Senior Member
    Galego (Rías Baixas)
    When my neighbours quote my dog - a hyperactive Border Collie - they say she utters ghau ghau , the gh being the way the sound equivalent to the Spanish J is written in Galician, the language that we speak around here as well as Spanish.
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    As far as I know, in czech is also "Baf baf" but maybe the spelling is "Vaf, vaf". I'm not sure, but that said to me my teacher of czech (she is czech).
    Yes, "Baf baf" might be used in imaginative literature, but it seems be not so common... In such words usually writing doesn't differ from pronunciation. I didn't yet hear "Vaf, vaf" saying in Czech. ;) .
    Most common is "Haf, haf" (IMHO).
     

    mkh

    Banned
    Iran, Farsi
    Hi,
    "To bark", in Persian, is "paars kardan" I'm not positive on this, but I think "woof-woof" translates to "wow-wow" in Persian.
    Also, "haapu" is the word Persian-speaking kids use for "doggie"
    Paars and bark may be equal words.
    In Iran bark of dog: vagh vagh, hab hab, hap hap, ow ow.
    The sound of jackal and wolf: zuz, or zuzueh.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    To me the most interesting are the conclusions: what kind of sounds are used ? I am trying to add some temporary conclusions in bold below (so it might be interesting to focus on divergences from or corrections of those temporary conclusions):
    Starting on this collection I found in another thread ( information from wikipedia)
    I suggest some conclusions below :
    - bow-wow (or woof-woof) in English,
    - wau-wau in German,
    - uau-uau in Interlingua,
    - ouah-ouah in French,
    - gaf-gaf in Russian,
    - hav-hav in Hebrew,
    - wan-wan, bau-bau, or kyan-kyan in Japanese,
    - guau-guau in Spanish,
    - bau-bau in Italian,
    - vov-vov in Danish, woef woef [as English woof] or
    - waf waf in Dutch or woef-woef, if bigger
    - wou wou in Cantonese,
    - voff-voff in [[Icelandic language|Icelandic,
    - hau-hau in Finnish and Polish,
    - haf-haf in Czech, hav-hav (pronounced like English how-how) in Slovak,
    - guk guk in Indonesian, [is this a plosive ?]
    - bub bub in Catalan,
    - ghav-ghav in Modern Greek,
    - wou wou in Teso,
    - gâu gâu in Vietnamese and [plosive ?]
    - meong meong in Korean. [strange to me: m to start with ?]

    Some trends I seem to distinguish :
    - mostly fricatives to start with (is w fricative ?), seldom plosives
    - fricatives at the end or second part of diphthong (mostly sounding like w)
    - rather open vowels

    Correct ? But then why meong ? Any ideas ?
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    You might know approximants by the name of "spirants". They are similar to fricatives, but are produced with less friction.

    P.S. It seems nobody mentioned the Portuguese onomatopoeia yet. I would say the most common are ão-ão and au-au. The two have similar pronunciations; they are composed of diphthongs. My initial guess was that they had originated in an alliteration of ua-ua (wa-wa), but then I saw the Finnish example hau-hau, and now I'm not so sure.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I see, thanks. I must say: I studied phonetics when I was quite young (at 18-19), which is over 30 years ago, alas !

    Do you know any other types of consonants by the way ? Or do you know a website where I can find them ?
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Anyone having an idea of how you explain that there are both spirants and plosives at the beginning ? Is is perception (meaning one thinks s/he hears it, but ...) ? Eespecially the meong seems strange to me.
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Just asking, KarL: is this /g/ a plosive ? And: what is the difference between the two (big and small dogs, /u/ referring to the bigger one ?) ?
    :eek: What is a plosive?

    I've never thought about it, but "guk-guk" is used more for small dogs, and "gong-gong" more for bigger dogs. But they're basically interchangeable.
    The verb "to bark" only have one form: gonggong.
     
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