How do we name the feeling of wanting to toilet

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
How do we name the feeling right before we go poo and go pee pee? For example, if I have kept the urine or poo for a long time ,but I can't get a chance to release. Dow do we describe the feeling? I'm too what?
Thanks in advance.
 
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  • Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "I'm bursting"
    "I'm bursting for the loo"
    "I'm bursting to go"
    "I'm busting"
    "I'm busting to go"

    These are heard in British English, and generally relate to urinating. The list is not exhaustive - there are probably a lot more examples (some of which likely to be humorous or not to be uttered in polite society!).

    As a rule, I would say the first one, but only if I were with family or friends. In a more formal society you wouldn't be quite so open about your intentions.
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    To me, "busting a gut" means 'working very hard' (sounds Australian English to me, although you would hear it in the UK). I wouldn't use it in reference to going to the loo.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    "I really have to go to the bathroom" or just "I really have to go." You'll be understood. ;) (This is in the U.S., of course.) There are so many more ways of saying this, but we're cautioned on this forum not to provide lists. :eek:
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "I really have to go to the bathroom" or just "I really have to go." You'll be understood. ;) (This is in the U.S., of course.) There are so many more ways of saying this, but we're cautioned on this forum not to provide lists. :eek:
    Works very well for UK English as well (although we would usually change "bathroom" for "toilet" or "loo", but "bathroom" would be understood nonetheless)
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi,
    How do we name the feeling right before we go poo and go pee pee? For example, if I have kept the urine or poo for a long time ,but I can't get a chance to release. Dow do we describe the feeling? I'm too what?
    Thanks in advance.
    You could also say "I'm dying to go", or "I need to go" (for either activity).
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'd say the same as Stoggler, "bursting", especially since I'm female and we don't have "guts" ;). "I can't hold it any more" "I'm dying to go." are also possible.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    A couple more.:)

    I'm peeing myself
    (this is specific to urine, obviously) /I'm dying to go to the loo (this could refer to either urine or poo) .

    These are very informal, for use with family and friends only, not when you're in polite society.:)

    Cross-posted with stoggler, sorry.;)
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A couple more.:)

    I'm peeing myself
    (this is specific to urine, obviously) /I'm dying to go to the loo (this could refer to either urine or poo) .

    These are very informal, for use with family and friends only, not when you're in polite society.:)

    Cross-posted with stoggler, sorry.;)
    I've never realized, until now, that BrE had so many similarities with describing such things compared with the AmE versions of laughing.

    Both, "busting a gut" and "peeing myself" are commonly used to express experiencing bouts of intense laughter.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I like the word "burst" best, because it can tell the feeling accurately. Of course, all the other answers are very good. Thank yous!!
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I've never realized, until now, that BrE had so many similarities with describing such things compared with the AmE versions of laughing.

    Both, "busting a gut" and "peeing myself" are commonly used to express experiencing bouts of intense laughter.
    I'm really not sure that "busting a gut" has anything to do with peeing or needing the toilet in any way, regardless of what was said above. Just sounds odd to me.

    Perhaps that's worthy of a separate thread
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Medically speaking, you have an urge (usually sudden) to go to the toilet. This symptom is called urgency. But you wouldn't say this in speech, unlike the alternatives described above.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Myridon, that was supposed to be ironic ;). I do know what "guts" means, but it's a term that I wouldn't care to use, except maybe metaphorically or when I'm gutting fish or poultry. I'd say "intestines" or "abdomen" (a pain in the abdomen or belly, rather than guts). Maybe a British thing?
     
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