How do you call a person who rents a room in an apartment?

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi teachers,
How do you call a person who rents a room in an apartment? Is it a tenant?

Mrs. Ashton: Nice to meet you. You are the new tenant. OK Peter, show the apartment to Ben, please.

Thanks in advance.
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Who is Mrs. Ashton talking to? And who are Peter and Ben. Without knowing who the "new tenant" is, it's rather confusing.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Who is Mrs. Ashton talking to? And who are Peter and Ben. Without knowing who the "new tenant" is, it's rather confusing.
    Mrs. Ashton has a big apartment with four rooms and she rents them to students who study at the university near her apartment.
    Peter, who is Ben's friend, already rents a room in her house and Ben is going to rent the one which is free now.

    TL
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "You are the new tenant" is odd if it's true – it's too obvious a statement. "You must be our new tenant" is better. But calling him a tenant means that he has already rented the room – apparently without seeing it first. That's possible, of course, but a bit adventurous. :)
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    "You are the new tenant" is odd if it's true – it's too obvious a statement. "You must be our new tenant" is better. But calling him a tenant means that he has already rented the room – apparently without seeing it first. That's possible, of course, but a bit adventurous. :)
    Hi Copyright,
    Got it! You are very right.
    Could it be "You must be the new candidate to be a tenant"? :rolleyes:

    TL
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If someone lives in a flat or any kind of property and lets it out to other people, I think those people are lodgers rather than tenants. If some food is supplied, they could be boarders.

    From our dictionary: lodger - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    a person who rents quarters in another's house;
    roomer. (Random House)

    a person who pays rent in return for accommodation in someone else's house (Collins)
    If Mrs Ashton doesn't live in the apartment herself, tenant is fine, of course.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi teachers,
    How do you call a person who rents a room in an apartment? Is it a tenant?
    No: in English law "tenants" have exclusive possession - in other words they normally have the right not to let the landlord in their home. This is not normally the case when you rent a room in someone's home.

    As Natkretep says. we call people who pay for just a room in a shared house, where the owner lives too, "lodgers" or "boarders", though the law calls them "licensees". If you want to sound less hierarchical, and not explain the relationship, you can refer to them as "housemates".

    It gets trickier if the landlord does not live in the house.
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think AE is a bit broader. From the Unabridged Random House: tenant

    1. a person or group that rents and occupies land, a house, an office, or the like, from another for a period of time;
    lessee.
    2. Law, a person who holds or possesses for a time lands, tenements, or personalty of another, usually for rent.
    3. an occupant or inhabitant of any place.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    No: in English law "tenants" have exclusive possession
    Yes, but not all spoken or written English is legal English. When I rented a room in a private house as a student I would have described myself as a tenant, not a lodger. The landlady might have called me a lodger. I don't know what she wanted to call my fellow tenant, but we got thrown out becasue of his conduct. :mad:

    Collins dictionary seems to be happy for me to call myself a tenant
    1. a person who holds, occupies, or possesses land or property by any kind of right or title, esp from a landlord under a lease
    2. a person who has the use of a house, flat, etc, subject to the payment of rent
    3. any holder or occupant
    As is the OED, but I won't add another quotation.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    This UK website explains the difference between a 'lodger' and a 'tenant'. It's pretty much the same in Australia. I couldn't find anything about the differences in the USA.

    What's the difference between a tenant and a lodger?

    If you live in the property with people you are renting rooms out to, you are a live in landlord, or resident landlord, and you have lodgers not tenants. But if you don't live in the property, and it's rented out to an individual, a family or room by room to lots of people, you are a live out landlord, with one or more tenants.................
     
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