How do you call an irritation between the legs?

  • roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    river said:
    A rash is the first thing that comes to mind.
    Now that you told me the word I was thinking about another word that it translation means something close to "rash"
    what do you think about "abrasion" ?
    is it commonly used as "rash" ?

    thanks.
     

    Franglais

    Senior Member
    English. England.
    Abrasion refers to the coastline and rocks! Abrasion, personally, has never been seen by me in the medical world.
     

    Nala

    Senior Member
    French, Canada
    I have heard "abrasion" used in a medical context and it meant "wear" as in "skin that is worn by friction" (of pantleg against the thigh for example - thus creating a rash!) :)
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Nala said:
    I have heard "abrasion" used in a medical context and it meant "wear" as in "skin that is worn by friction" (of pantleg against the thigh for example - thus creating a rash!) :)
    So from the comment before you I understand nobody uses it :)

    anyway "rash" sounds much better :)

    and thank you too for your answer :)
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    roniy said:
    How What do you call an irritation between the legs?
    timpeac said:
    The 7-year itch?:D
    Ha! :D Good one!

    Abrasion is often heard in medical/police dramas on U.S. television in the context of an injury. In contrast, a rash is a skin eruption that usually results from a disease or contact with certain substances (like poison ivy).

    Elisabetta
     

    GavinCorder

    Banned
    English English (from England)
    Franglais said:
    Abrasion refers to the coastline and rocks! Abrasion, personally, has never been seen by me in the medical world.
    Oh I've seen plenty, call it what you will...

    Sores, rashes, abrasions, weeping pustules, festering scabs, itchy parts, jock rot, ummmm....... I suggest ointment or talcum powder as a remedy!
     

    DavyBCN

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    timpeac said:
    The 7-year itch?:D
    If I had written that (or some of the other thoughts which popped into my head) a Moderator would probably have deleted it.:) . Without wishing to get too medical, a rash can be anywhere on the body of course. If there a special word for one on the legs I'm not sure I want to know.
     

    GavinCorder

    Banned
    English English (from England)
    An abrasion is patch of skin that rubbed or scraped raw, but a rash is just bumps and itchy red bits. Which only if rubbed and scraped (as by the action of the thighs perhaps) it could be called an abrasion, surely?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    What happens to rocks is erosion, partly through abrasion.

    Turning without a hint of a smile to irritation between the legs, abrasion could cause irritation - chafing as Kelly B suggests. Abrasion appears frequently in medical texts (4793 hits in PubMed - although these cover a wide variety of topics - not only skin abrasion).

    However, what you choose to call this irritation probably depends on what caused it.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    No, not a chafe. I omitted the article (edit: on purpose). A person doesn't have an excema, either. But a person with a rash may have excema, or chafe, or something else we probably don't want to know about.

    chafe
    A. noun
    [...]
    2. soreness and warmth caused by friction

    Edited to add:
    in an earnest attempt to alleviate Panj's failure to smile, I show you the chafe shield.
     

    GavinCorder

    Banned
    English English (from England)
    No I'm not having that no matter how jolly you are and no matter how po faced Panj is! Chafe is not a noun! It's a verb! And your Chafe Shield is a shield against chafing not a protector of the chafe! But LOL!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Boring comment.
    Chafe is both noun and verb.
    OK, so it was a verb first - but that is no surprise.
    A chafe (noun) is a result of chafing (verb).
     

    GavinCorder

    Banned
    English English (from England)
    panjandrum said:
    Boring comment.
    Chafe is both noun and verb.
    OK, so it was a verb first - but that is no surprise.
    A chafe (noun) is a result of chafing (verb).
    Oh dear, have I exhausted an adversary so soon? Boring?

    Let's go. No it's not a noun in modern English English.

    I suppose there is room for a chafe upon my knee - but I would say that was american....

    Your move.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    GavinCorder said:
    [...] Chafe is not a noun! It's a verb! [...]
    In the interests of ensuring clarity for our international membership, it is worth pointing out that there are alternative views on this point. Clearly, the OED and Collins are of the view that chafe is both verb and noun. It may be the case, of course, that in current English English the noun has fallen into disuse.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    I'm starting to feel an irritation between the eyes seeing this thread pop to the top again and again. Does that have a name? :p

    Elisabetta
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    panjandrum said:
    In the interests of ensuring clarity for our international membership, it is worth pointing out that there are alternative views on this point. Clearly, the OED and Collins are of the view that chafe is both verb and noun. It may be the case, of course, that in current English English the noun has fallen into disuse.
    We do say, in AE, though, "I have some chafing" or "I have a little chafing". "Chafe" as a noun... that I've never heard.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    James Brandon said:
    I suppose one must make the difference between the cause and the consequences or symptoms. Just ask your Mum next time.:D
    I do not have a confusion and I think that I will leave the question of my mum for something that I don't know:) .

    I suspect that the only thing I would need to ensure an utter lack of confusion is context.

    .,,
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    foxfirebrand said:
    A discreetly conventional response, I think.
    .
    That depends on the orientation of the writer as the author may be being irritated in more than one place by multiple irritants.

    To remain on thread may I state;

    The Army has 'crotch rot'.

    .,,
    I am holding my liquor by the ears.
     
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