how do you read sport score and maths formulas?

lady_ashley

Member
Russian
Hi,
could you please help me read these out in English:

tennis score: Agassi - Yang 6 - 0; 4 - 6;
football score: Manchester United 3 Tottenham Hotspurs 0

And some maths things:
6:2=3
5x3=15
x2
y3
x6

a2 - b2 = (a + b) x (a - b)
01-324-5507 (I don't even know what it is!)

Thanks a lot!

 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi,
    could you please help me read these out in English:

    tennis score: Agassi - Yang 6 - 0; 4 - 6; not sure, possibly six-nothing, four-six
    football score: Manchester United 3 three Tottenham Hotspurs 0 nil

    And some maths things:
    6:2=3 six divided by two equals three
    5x3=15 five multiplied by three equals fifteen (OR: five times three equals fifteen)
    x2 is that a small two above the line? that would be eks-squared (OR: eks-to-the-power-of-two)
    y3 if as above: y-cubed (OR: y-to-the-power-of-three)
    x6 if as above: eks-to-the-power-of-six
    a2 - b2 = (a + b) x (a - b) if as above: a-squared minus b-squared equals a-plus-b multiplied by a-minus-b
    01-324-5507 (I don't even know what it is!) that's an old London phone number: oh-one-three-two-four-double-five-oh-seven (OR: ... five-five-oh-seven)

    This is all British English usage. And I am prepared to be corrected on any of it.

    Thanks a lot!
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    As ewie, except that the tennis score is six-love, four-six.
    And I'd say times rather than multiplied by, so:
    Five times three is fifteen.
    A sqared minus b squared equals a plus b times a minus b.
    I know that this is not strictly correct because of the brackets (as I've said it, the right hand side might be taken as a + ba - b) but there is no ambiguity in practice.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    As ewie, except that the tennis score is six-love, four-six.
    That was my initial thought too, Pan. But then I thought, when they're talking of sets (games? ~ I'm no expert on tennis either), don't they use nothing, reserving the use of love for points scored in a set/game (thirty-love, forty-love, etc.)????
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    That was my initial thought too, Pan. But then I thought, when they're talking of sets (games? ~ I'm no expert on tennis either), don't they use nothing, reserving the use of love for points scored in a set/game (thirty-love, forty-love, etc.)????
    Goof point.
    I played the set scores over in my head a few times and I'm sure there is a little rut worn there from hearing the match score read as Agassi won, three sets to one: six four, four six, six love, six love.
    On the other hand, the little ruts in my brain can be very misleading sometimes - and it's a very long time since I last played tennis.
     

    lady_ashley

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much!
    Yes, British Usage is what I was actually looking for, Thanks again!:)

    Macmillan dictionary gives a game example with tennis score: forty-love. I guess set score follows the same model.
     

    Franglais Maestro

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi Lady a
    just a hint.
    If you do not have superscript for doing indices, the convention is to use the ^ symbol
    x^3 is x cubed. 10^-2 = 1/100 etc.

    Also 6:2 in the UK would be typed 6/2. The colon : is normally used when talking about ratios. The ratio of men to women in the university is 3:7. The colon is spoken as to. The ratio is three to seven

    Because maths teachers are lazy, they often say 6/2 as "six over two". This is because they often have bigger fractions to read aloud. In fact they often say "six upon two"
    Normal people ( not mathematicians) say "divided by"

    The use of / and ^ is important because they actually work as operators in microsoft excel and all spreadsheets and maths programs.

    Dosvidanya
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    x² x³

    I got these by typing x then ALT253 and x then ALT252 respectively.
    Of course keyboards, operating systems, etc. vary hugely (I suppose)
     

    Franglais Maestro

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi ewie
    in text that's ok, but ^, *, and / actually work in spreadsheets and are understood by most people doing basic maths.
    Word has a superscript and subscript tool.
     
    For sport scores, there is also this strange way of expressing a draw:

    Celtic drew 2-all with Rangers

    I am not certain if it applies to everything or just football.

    Also (moving away from the way they are read), scores are often written in this way: City 1-0 United, but would be presumably read: City 1, United 0?
     

    Gorgiewave

    Senior Member
    Scotland, English
    Heart of Midlothian 4 - 0 Hibernian
    On the TV: "Heart of Midlothian 4, Hibernian nil".
    In the street, reporting the result "four nil to Hearts" or "four nil for Hearts".
    "Heart of Midlothian 4 - 4 Hibernian"
    "Heart of Midlothian four Hibernian four"
    "four all in the game between Hearts and Hibs"
    "four each"

    "Nil nil". Not "nil each". "Nil all" in England, but not Scotland.

    Real results by the way, I was there and that´s how they were reported.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi ewie
    in text that's ok, but ^, *, and / actually work in spreadsheets and are understood by most people doing basic maths.
    Word has a superscript and subscript tool.
    Right-o, Frang ~ I'll take your word for it. I'm afraid I'm so far beyond basic maths that I'm now in the land of No Maths At All.
     
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