How far have you gone with a girl?

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Dicie1212

New Member
American English
Greetings,

Well, I've been having trouble with these two sentences for a while. I'm trying to firgure out how to say:
[...]
"How far have you gone with a girl?"
I got in touch with a Salvadorean friend and we're just asking each other random questions. Here's my (failed) attempt:

[...]
¿Hasta donde fuiste con una chica?

Thanks in advance guys =)

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Moderation note
: the thread has been split in two. Next time, please remember to make only one question per thread (rule 2). Thanks and welcome! :)
 
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  • JeSuisSnob

    Ombudsmod (Sp-Eng / Sólo Español)
    Mexican Spanish
    I understand it as: "¿Qué tan lejos has llegado con una chica?"
    I concur. You can also say in Mexican Spanish: "¿qué tan lejos has llegado con una chava?"

    This is another possibility (I'm just putting between brackets a bit more of context): "hasta dónde has llegado [en una relación] con una chica/chava?"

    Regards.
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    edw and JesuisSnob have proposed well translated sentences.

    Let's take a glance:

    "How far have you gone with a girl?"

    "Cuán lejos tú has ido (llegado) con una chica?"

    It means actually what the above users have said. It's all about a relationship. Literally speaking, the traduction in spanish would be either for "gone, arrived, came" (all almost the same with different ways to use, contexts as well); all means the same - the duration of a relationship.

    In this case, "gone" is the one and only way to apply to "be with a girl over a period of time".

    Hope we've been able to help you correctly.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I don't think that 'How far have you gone' refers to the length of a relationship.
    More likely the speaker is asking the other person if he/she has got close to having sex with his/her partner yet.
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I don't think that 'How far have you gone' refers to the length of a relationship.
    More likely the speaker is asking the other person if he/she has got close to having sex with his/her partner yet.
    In that case, the speaker directly would say: "How far have you been waiting to get a girl?" - Guess so.

    I wonder why to make a very open question instead of going directly to the point.

    You're from UK and you might clarify it, in order that british girls don't stamp our balls with a shoe. ^^
     

    Mustermisstler

    Senior Member
    Spanish.Spain
    ¿Hasta dónde has llegado con una chica? sound as if you are asking how close to having sex with a girl somebody was.

    You can say jokingly : Hasta la puerta de su casa.

    If you we are talking about the length of the relationship with a girl , I would say :
    ¿Cuánto ha sido lo máximo que has durado en una relación con un chica?
    ¿Cuánto ha sido lo máximo que has durado con una chica?
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    You're right Mustermisstler on that.

    But, as you red in my previous post - I wonder why to make an open question and not a direct question.

    (All depends on the people who is talking and the territory-language, I guess).

    Let me know if I'm wrong, please.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    In that case, the speaker directly would say: "How far have you been waiting to get a girl?" - Guess so.

    I wonder why to make a very open question instead of going directly to the point.

    You're from UK and you might clarify it, in order that british girls don't stamp our balls with a shoe. ^^
    It's a common enough expression in BrE, especially with young people.
    For example:
    'Have you gone all the way with a girl yet?' (Have you lost your virginity?)
     

    danielsleeps

    New Member
    USA
    American English
    It's probably important to note that amongst American teens, the question "how far have you gone with a girl" is often answered with "First base/second base, etc..." with reference to that vulgar metaphor that links each "base" in baseball with a sexual activity that increases in intensity until "home run," which refers to "having gone all the way," i.e., having sex. Is there a corresponding metaphor in any sort of Spanish? Perhaps not sport related, but with a similar level or ranking metaphor?

    That said, Dicie1212, you might be better off being blunt...
    "¿Qué has hecho con una chica?" I'm assuming will get the point across, as I'm sure others have suggested.

    Daniel!
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    As you know, each country has its own metaphors or ways to speak each other about "the process to get a girl".

    For example, we can say to a guy: "So, for when?" (too literally but it means the receptor shall answer how faster or slower he's going with a girl, making a very suggestive question). If somebody is closer to have sex with a girl he just could answer: "Well, I'm about" (in process).

    We usually apply the sports metaphor with gays; it may be either for joking or injuring - i.e. "He's an own goal" / "He kicks back" = "He's gay!".

    Back to women, having sex is vulgarly called "To wet", "To bury/plant the yam" and much more! Yup, I know what all of you are thinking - We're quite vulgar! - All of this covers different argots, anyway.

    Anything else? :p

    Cheers people.
     

    aloofsocialite

    Senior Member
    English - USA (California)
    As you know, each country has its own metaphors or ways to speak each other about "the process to get a girl".

    For example, we can say to a guy: "So, for when?" (too literally but it means the receptor shall answer how faster or slower he's going with a girl, making a very suggestive question). If somebody is closer to have sex with a girl he just could answer: "Well, I'm about" (in process).

    We usually apply the sports metaphor with gays; it may be either for joking or injuring - i.e. "He's an own goal" / "He kicks back" = "He's gay!".

    Back to women, having sex is vulgarly called "To wet", "To bury/plant the yam" and much more! Yup, I know what all of you are thinking - We're quite vulgar! - All of this covers different argots, anyway.

    Anything else? :p

    Cheers people.
    I don't get it. Are you translating fixed expressions directly from Spanish into English... with your "so, for when", "to wet", "plant the yam", "own a goal", etc.? None of these phrases exist where I live, some don't make much sense grammatically (in English).
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Exactly, aloofsocialite - It was to get back to danielsleeps. You just need to translate it quasi-literally and use your imagination. I can explain each of those phrases but it would be extremely vulgar, wouldn't it?

    For us, the metaphor related to baseball doesn't mean anything. (Even 'cause is not a popular sport over here).

    Anyway, we learn each other, don't we?
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I have to agree with aloofsocialite that your attempts at literal translations of Spanish idioms to English don't make a lot of sense.
     

    danielsleeps

    New Member
    USA
    American English
    As you know, each country has its own metaphors or ways to speak each other about "the process to get a girl".

    For example, we can say to a guy: "So, for when?" (too literally but it means the receptor shall answer how faster or slower he's going with a girl, making a very suggestive question). If somebody is closer to have sex with a girl he just could answer: "Well, I'm about" (in process).

    We usually apply the sports metaphor with gays; it may be either for joking or injuring - i.e. "He's an own goal" / "He kicks back" = "He's gay!".

    Back to women, having sex is vulgarly called "To wet", "To bury/plant the yam" and much more! Yup, I know what all of you are thinking - We're quite vulgar! - All of this covers different argots, anyway.

    Anything else? :p

    Cheers people.
    CristianPoow, I think everyone on the thread would be interested to hear those idioms in the original Spanish :)
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    CristianPoow, I think everyone on the thread would be interested to hear those idioms in the original Spanish :)
    With pleasure:

    "So, for when?" = "Y? Para cuándo?" (Suggestive, he really need to know it!)
    "Well, I'm about" = "Bueno, estoy a punto" (He's closer, but maybe a little resigned).

    * We usually say "Bueh / Bue"; which indicates bit of resignation to the question.

    "He's an own goal" = "Es un gol en contra".
    "He kicks back" = "Patea para atrás".

    (Don't need to explain these sentences, I guess; use your imagination!).

    "To wet" = "Mojar" (having sex; the organs are just wet!),
    "To plant a yam" = "Enterrar (plantar) la batata" (what can you imagine by "yam"? - too easy!).

    We set too many names to the sexual organs. But I think the rules don't allow us to talk about sex in a language-forum. Send a private message if necessary. Keep it serious.

    :)
     

    danielsleeps

    New Member
    USA
    American English
    "He's an own goal" = "Es un gol en contra".
    "He kicks back" = "Patea para atrás".

    (Don't need to explain these sentences, I guess; use your imagination!).
    Very interesting: in English, a similar metaphor exists: "He plays for the other team," or, "he doesn't play for our side" can mean homosexual.
     

    CristianPoow

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Very interesting: in English, a similar metaphor exists: "He plays for the other team," or, "he doesn't play for our side" can mean homosexual.
    Thanks! So, finally we have the exact translation for both ways to call a gay.

    Do you use it for joking or injuring as well?

    I have friends which are gays, and we can really make jokes about it without any kind of discrimination.
     
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