how he should mistrust its ever conducting permanently to his happiness or hers

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Charlotte Brontë – Jane Eyre (Chap. 34) | Genius

Quotation: I understood, as by inspiration, the nature of his love for Miss Oliver; I agreed with him that it was but a love of the senses. I comprehended how he should despise himself for the feverish influence it exercised over him; how he should wish to stifle and destroy it; how he should mistrust its ever conducting permanently to his happiness or hers. I saw he was of the material from which nature hews her heroes—Christian and Pagan—her lawgivers, her statesmen, her conquerors: a steadfast bulwark for great interests to rest upon; but, at the fireside, too often a cold cumbrous column, gloomy and out of place.
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Hi everyone! I don’t quite understand the bold part.

I think “to conduct to” similar with “to lead to”:
To lead => 4. to result in; tend toward[~ + to + object]
The incident led to her resignation.

So I interpret it as below. Is it correct?

The sentence => why he would doubt the love would always make him or her happy.
 
  • Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :D I see. Thank you for your corrections.

    I have a question. Is there difference between "leading permanently to happiness" and "leading to permanent happiness"? I'm not sure. :confused: In my opinion:

    the feverish influence leads permanently to his or her happiness => though the feverish influence leads to his or her happiness now, it will cease to work at some time in the future.

    the feverish influence leads to his or her permanent happiness => the feverish influence leads to his or her happiness. Once the happiness is produced, it will be enduring.

    I didn't quite understand here. So I interpreted the bold part as "...would always make his or her happy". :confused:
     
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