how introduce a person with a Master Degree

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valerio sperati

Member
Italian
Greetings,
In a webpage addressed to International audience, I need to formally introduce some people with different academic titles.
I'm using the abbreviation "dr." for people with the PhD title, without any reference to the field of study, e.g. "dr. John Doe".
My question is how introduce a person with a Master Degree (or MA), again without reference to the field of study.
I guess that "MA John Doe" is somehow uncorrect, as I always find MA followed by the field (e.g. "MA in psychology").
Any suggestion?
Courteously,
Valerio
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    You do say Dr. So-and-so for someone with a PhD (example Dr. Jill Biden the new first lady of the United states) but there is no particular honorific for someone with a MA. You can put MA, BA, BSc after someone's name without indicating their area of study. It might appear just a little pretentious, however, to most native speakers of English, but not over the top, in my opinion.
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Also, you might add some context about what you mean by "formally introduce some people." Are you introducing two individuals to each other in a social setting? Are you at a microphone introducing speakers to an audience? I agree with rrose that we write the degree after the name (and don't forget to capitalize the D in Dr.) but as Paul said, we use these degree credentials rarely in speaking. Also, a Master Degree is not considered a "title." If the person is working at a university, the "title" would be the name of the position - Dean, Professor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor - regardless of credential.
     

    valerio sperati

    Member
    Italian
    Also, you might add some context about what you mean by "formally introduce some people." Are you introducing two individuals to each other in a social setting? Are you at a microphone introducing speakers to an audience? I agree with rrose that we write the degree after the name (and don't forget to capitalize the D in Dr.) but as Paul said, we use these degree credentials rarely in speaking. Also, a Master Degree is not considered a "title." If the person is working at a university, the "title" would be the name of the position - Dean, Professor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor - regardless of credential.
    Here is the context: the names appear in a pdf which illustrates a European Project starting right now. In more detail, the names refer to the team leaders of the partners (i.e. the research groups) supporting the project, and are used as main contacts for each research group.
    The format I chose for the current pdf is like the following:

    CONTACTS:
    1. Dr. Donald Duck (coordinator of the project at University of Jupiter)
    2. Dr. Dr. Uncle Scrooge (Univ. of Pluto)
    3. Mickey Mouse (Univ. of Mars)
    4. Daisy Duck (Univ. of Venus)
    Now, 1 is a Phd, 2 got two Phd, 3 is both an MD and professor, and 4 is MA in engineer.
    So, in your opinion, what is the best formal presentation?

    Proposal 1: only university degrees
    1. Dr. Donald Duck (coordinator of the project at University of Jupiter)
    2. Dr. Uncle Scrooge (Univ. of Pluto)
    3. Mickey Mouse, MD (Univ. of Mars)
    4. Daisy Duck, MA (Univ. of Venus)
    Proposal 2: just personal names
    1. Donald Duck (coordinator of the project at University of Jupiter)
    2. Uncle Scrooge (Univ. of Pluto)
    3. Mickey Mouse (Univ. of Mars)
    4. Daisy Duck (Univ. of Venus)

    Proposal 3: university degrees + academic titles
    1. Dr. Donald Duck (coordinator of the project at University of Jupiter)
    2. Prof. Dr. Dr. Uncle Scrooge (Univ. of Pluto)
    3. Prof. Mickey Mouse, MD (Univ. of Mars)
    4. Daisy Duck, MA (Univ. of Venus)
    Thanks a lot for the tips!
    Valerio
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    My thoughts
    1. Dr. Donald Duck (coordinator of the project at University of Jupiter)
    2. Dr. Uncle Scrooge (Univ. of Pluto)
    3. Prof. Mickey Mouse, MD (Univ. of Mars)
    4. Ms. Daisy Duck, MA (Univ. of Venus)
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Ok, there seems to be some inconsistency in Proposal 1. If you are using "university degrees" the first two should be Donald Duck, Ph.D, and Uncle Scrooge, Ph.D.

    In "contacts" and in Proposal 3 - DO NOT use "Dr. Dr." - if the person has two Ph.D's they can be listed separately - Ph.D. in Geology, Ph.D. in Economics

    My personal choice would be # 3
     

    valerio sperati

    Member
    Italian
    Ok, there seems to be some inconsistency in Proposal 1. If you are using "university degrees" the first two should be Donald Duck, Ph.D, and Uncle Scrooge, Ph.D.

    In "contacts" and in Proposal 3 - DO NOT use "Dr. Dr." - if the person has two Ph.D's they can be listed separately - Ph.D. in Geology, Ph.D. in Economics

    My personal choice would be # 3
    Well, as far as I know "Dr." is a short for "PhD", so they should be interchageable.
    About the double use of "Dr. Dr." ....it is horrible to see but it seems to be the official way to certify a double PhD! Your proposal to list them separately would be the best graphical option, but unfortunately I have a space problem in the pdf!

    Thanks a lot to everyone. I agree with you: the winner seems to be the proposal 3!
    Courteously,
    Valerio
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Dr. is not interchangeable with Ph.D. since it also refers to a medical doctor (M.D.).
    I've spent my entire professional life around people with these degrees and I have never seen nor heard "Dr. Dr." in any context.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    What does Daisy Duck do for a living, by the way? If she teaches engineering at a university (even if she doesn't have a PhD), then she should also be "Prof. Daisy Duck," not "Ms. Daisy Duck."

    Incidentally, a Master's degree in Engineering is not an MA (Master of Arts) but an MEng. Daisy Duck would not like being called an MA if she's not. :)

    And I agree with joanvillafane: longtime academic here, and I have never, ever seen "Dr. Dr.". I think there might be something like that in German, but not in English. People will assume it's a typo.
     

    Passante

    Senior Member
    italian
    Ok, there seems to be some inconsistency in Proposal 1. If you are using "university degrees" the first two should be Donald Duck, Ph.D, and Uncle Scrooge, Ph.D.

    In "contacts" and in Proposal 3 - DO NOT use "Dr. Dr." - if the person has two Ph.D's they can be listed separately - Ph.D. in Geology, Ph.D. in Economics

    My personal choice would be # 3
    Domanda non usate parole tipo doppia Laurea in e in.. O doppio master o plurilaureato?
     
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