How many bookies did you lay it around on?

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Marsellus, a criminal boos, gives Butch, a boxer, money for him to lose to his opponent in the 5th round, and Butch accepts the deal. Later, in the fight, he instead wins it (even, unintentionally though, killing the opponent at the ring), and escapes. later he talks on the phone with someone:
— What the fuck'd I tell ya? Huh? As soon as the word got out the fix was in, man, the odds went through the roof. [then talking about the death of his opponent, sounding regrettable, but not very much, then again about the money] How many bookies did you lay it around on? All eight? How long to collect? So you'll have it all by tomorrow night?
Pulp Fiction, movie

Could you explain to me what the pattern/verb is?

"To lay something around on someone"? What does it mean?...

Thank yuo.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    “All eight?” seems to suggest there were 8 bookies. So the question is, did you lay the bet with all of them?

    There’s nothing there to suggest that the money (about which there’s no info) was divided equally. That seems to be pure speculation on your part.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    There’s nothing there to suggest that the money (about which there’s no info) was divided equally. That seems to be pure speculation on your part.
    I meant that the fact of dividing the money ha had in parts (eqaual or not).

    But could you tell me please what the pattern is? Is it "to lay something around on someone", as I suggested in #1? Is it a phrasal veb, idiom? What meaning of "lay around on" is used here?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To lay a bet is to place a bet.

    How many bookies did you lay it around on? = How many bookies did you lay/place the bet with?

    The way it’s said is just colloquial. It doesn’t merit analysis. It’s not an idiom.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    To lay a bet is to place a bet.

    How many bookies did you lay it around on? = How many bookies did you lay/place the bet with?

    The way it’s said is just colloquial. It doesn’t merit analysis. It’s not an idiom.
    So you lay a bet on something. But in the OP, the object of "on" is "bookies". What meaning of "on" is it?...
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    To lay a bet is to place a bet.
    Not really in British English. To lay a bet has the specific meaning of betting against the outcome. Punters generally place bets and bookies generally lay them (two sides of the same bet).

    My post here is not a reply to the OP's question where 'lay' clearly means 'place' in the terms I have just used, and from what I can tell this is standard American usage. This might also account for the 'on'; with 'place', the preposition would be 'with'.
     
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