How many days have you missed jogging this week?

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

In the sentence below, should I put on before "How many days"? Does it not result in ambiguity without on? People may understand it as "For how many days", I feel.

A: How many days have you missed jogging this week?
B: Monday, Thursday, Friday. Altogether, 3 days.
 
  • stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much.
    But if B said, "Wedneseday, Thursday, Friday. 3 days", three days in a row, is it still right for the context?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would answer the question first, and then add any unasked-for clarification:

    A: How many days have you missed jogging this week?
    B: Three (days) – Monday, Thursday and Friday.
    B: Three (days) – Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    If you actually want or expect clarification of the days, then I think you'd need to ask the question as "Which days have you missed jogging this week?"

    Which, incidentally, sounds more natural to me than "How many days ... ?"
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks.
    So, how many days does cause ambiguity.
    To avoid the ambiguity, should we say either “on how many days" or "for how many days"?

    (cross-posted with DonnyB.)
    OK, I would use which days.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    To avoid the ambiguity, should we say either “on how many days" or "for how many days"?
    I would interpret "On how many days... " as expecting an answer such as "three". But to me, "For how many days" means consecutive days, expecting an answer "three in a row".
     
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