How much does it worth?

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valdemar

Senior Member
Español mexicano
Is it correct? I thought it was 'How much is it worth'? but I've been surfing the internet and some people write it that way. So I'm not sure wheather is wrong or it's symply another way to say it. If this way is correct could you please explain me the difference between both.

thank you
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    No it's not correct. It's not at all correct. There's a lot of extremely incorrect English on the internet.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    In general in English there is no verb to express value, so we use "be" + the adjective "worth". Probably speakers of other languages, which do have a verb to express value, think "worth" is a verb in English. It's not!

    Spelling: simply.:)
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    What is the sentence in Spanish, valdemar? You might want to go to Spanish-English.
     

    valdemar

    Senior Member
    Español mexicano
    In general in English there is no verb to express value, so we use "be" + the adjective "worth". Probably speakers of other languages, which do have a verb to express value, think "worth" is a verb in English. It's not!

    Spelling: simply.:)
    Thank you for the correction Einstein.
    It's true!, in Spanish the equivalent word for 'value', - valor -, is also used as a verb. What you say is interesting because this is exaclty the case when I get confused. What does it mean these expressions for you:

    1.- a person worth millions.
    2.- a proposal not worth consideration
    3.- Prizes worth $10,000
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British

    1.- a person worth millions.
    2.- a proposal not worth consideration
    3.- Prizes worth $10,000

    In these cases, 'worth' is an adjective, meaning either: 'worthy of', in (2), or: 'of the value of', in (1) and (3).
     
    Last edited:

    valdemar

    Senior Member
    Español mexicano

    1.- a person worth millions.
    2.- a proposal not worth consideration
    3.- Prizes worth $10,000

    In these cases, 'worth' is an adjective, meaning either: 'worthy of', in (2), or: 'of the value of', in (1) and (3).
    Perfect explanation Wandle!!. Although this is a new grammatical construction for me, I can see the point of my confusion and everything is much clearer. Thank you so much
     
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