How much sugar do you take in your tea?

seitt

Senior Member
English/Welsh
Greetings,

Please, how do you say ‘How much?’?

E.g. ‘How much sugar do you take in your tea?’

Best wishes, and many thanks,

Simon
 
  • Ghabi

    AL/OL/Ar/Zh mod
    Cantonese
    For example, you may hear:
    -你 平常[habitually] 喝茶 加 多少 糖 呢?
    -中国人 喝茶 加 什么 糖!
     

    BODYholic

    Senior Member
    Chinese Cantonese
    颗糖 here reminds me of 颗心 :). Does "你有几颗心?" make any sense in Chinese (figuratively) ?
    It makes sense to me. You can ask a Casanova this question. :)

    Over here, we tend to use 颗 on (comparatively/relatively/presumably) small but valuable items. E.g. 心, 星, 钻石, 红豆(因为此物最相思。) & etc. There are exceptions, of course. We discussed this quite extensively previously. :)

    While raw sugar is almost worthless here, sugar cubes are still not something common enough to be present in every household in Singapore. These cubes are typically found in (better) restaurants and hence, we generally 'perceived' them as something valuable. Of course, in actual fact, these are readily available in any supermarkets and they are, needless to say, affordable. ;) This explains why we rarely say "幾塊糖" when referring to sugar cubes. While it is not wrong, it sounds coarse/unrefined to my ears. We may, however, say "几块冰糖".
     
    Last edited:

    viajero_canjeado

    Senior Member
    English - Southeastern USA
    This explains why we rarely say "幾塊糖" when referring to sugar cubes. While it is not wrong, it sounds coarse/unrefined to my ears.
    Ah, thanks for enlightening me. The 量詞 sometimes give me trouble. I suppose I had a misconception that 一顆 something would be round-ish (蘋果, 心) and 一粒 would generally be small (米, 沙)。

    块, to me, would usually refere to things of a bigger size than 颗, and also for things that are generally square or rectangular-shaped...
    I guess that's why I mistakenly thought it would apply to square-shaped sugar cubes.
     
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