How rude/offensive is "Get the Hump of/with?"

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arugunu

Member
Turkish
Is this phrase rude or offensive?
"I really got the hump with your questions this time?"
Also, would i say "to get the hump of" or "to get the hump with"?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It is hard to remember ... no, wait a minute, you have used this expression wrongly. Well, you have used it in a way that does not fit with my experience.

    He really took the hump.
    He has gone all humpy.

    He seemed to take offense about something and has either flounced out in disgust or has withdrawn completely and refused to talk to anyone.

    Is it rude or offensive?
    The words are not intrinsically rude or offensive.
    You may decide for yourself whether it is rude or offensive to allege that someone has taken offense.
     

    arugunu

    Member
    Turkish
    I have heard this sentence in a movie either,
    Yes,yes. As i recall now it was from the same movie LSandTSBarrels.
    It was like :
    "It doesn't include the amp, it doesn't include the speakers, and also it doesn't include me getting the hump with your stupid questions."
    That movie has got such a colourful-language...A bit exciting for foreigners : )))
     

    A90Six

    Senior Member
    England - English.
    arugunu said:
    Is this phrase rude or offensive?
    "I really got the hump with your questions this time?"
    Also, would I say "to get the hump of" or "to get the hump with"?
    This must be a BE thing if panj doesn't know of it. The sentence would be understood perfectly by me in London. I get the hump with people quite a lot. Some people give me the hump and others get the hump with me.

    It is not at all offensive, but is colloquial.

    The tern takes with, not of.

    In most cases, the hump can be replaced by annoyed. Gives me the hump would be replaced by makes me annoyed.
     
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