How to ask a student to go to their seat.

Golak das

Senior Member
bengali
How do we normally a ask a student to go to their seat during the class. If he's not sitting at?

Get onto your seat.
Go to your seat.
Go and sit on your bench.

Any other suggestions?
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Get onto your seat.:cross:
    Go to your seat.:cross:
    Go and sit on your bench. :cross:
    These are not correct idioms and they are orders not requests.
    Not correct idiomatically means that this is not how we use the language to ask people to sit down.
    We use 'please' whenever we make a polite request, regardless of age.
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    Ok let's say order than, if I order them saying those would I be right?
    These are not correct idioms and they are orders not requests.
    Not correct idiomatically means that this is not how we use the language to ask people to sit down.
    We use 'please' whenever we make a polite request, regardless of age.
    Let
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    "Get onto your seat" is not idiomatic. It sounds as though you want the student to crouch or stand with their feet on the seat, as though water were flooding the room.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    That's why we specifically say please sit on the chair.
    Not. On a chair means standing on it. In a chair means seated.
    'On a chair' does not mean 'standing on it.' Your rear end, a book, a sleeping cat can all be on a chair, but they are not standing on it.
    'Sit on a chair' means that your rear end is on the chair.
    'Stand on a chair' means that your feet are on the chair.
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    'On a chair' does not mean 'standing on it.' Your rear end, a book, a sleeping cat can all be on a chair, but they are not standing on it.
    'Sit on a chair' means that your rear end is on the chair.
    'Stand on a chair' means that your feet are on the chair.
    Ok I understood. Thanks for detailed explanation. And what about get into your seat.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I really do not see the problem with 'Go to your seat'. Obviously a teacher should not sound like a drill sergeant, but.... There are many ways to soften, e.g. "Kindly go to your seat" " "You should go to your seat, now." Adding a pupil's name. Tone of voice makes a big difference.

    I don't think we should talk about manners to the virtual exclusion of grammar.

    That said, Golak's proposals in this thread are often, likely, rather abrupt and imperious.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    What's the matter with "Please sit down (again)?' We suppose that the student will go back to his seat, bench, or place on the floor.
    I do think manners and courtesy are important because they are part of the culture the language is used in. I have noticed that Asians (people from the Indian subcontinent) tend to speak English very peremptorily. For example being told to "Sit down!" can be annoying if you choose to react to it.
    If people are used to ordering food and drink using the imperative idiom acceptable in their own language, they might find that the serving staff don't respond readily. "Give me two beers!"
    It's often seen here on the forum: "I want to know ...". How about "I'd like to know, please?"
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    What's the matter with "Please sit down (again)?' We suppose that the student will go back to his seat, bench, or place on the floor.
    I do think manners and courtesy are important because they are part of the culture the language is used in. I have noticed that Asians (people from the Indian subcontinent) tend to speak English very peremptorily. For example being told to "Sit down!" can be annoying if you choose to react to it.
    If people are used to ordering food and drink using the imperative idiom acceptable in their own language, they might find that the serving staff don't respond readily. "Give me two beers!"
    It's often seen here on the forum: "I want to know ...". How about "I'd like to know, please?"
    I have no problems with the suggestions, I just want to know the possible ways of saying that and also where I can use those in what circumstances all for only learning purpose and to avoid mistake.
     
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