How to differentiate between a noun clause and an adjective clause

Adelch

Member
Farsi
Hi.I wonder what kind of clauses these are.

The investigator has to find the person whose knife this is.

The investigator has to find out whose knife this is.

The investigator has to find out to whom this knife belongs.
 
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  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The first is a relative clause. It modifies the noun "person" and therefore functions as an adjective, so you could call it an adjective clause.
    The other two are noun clauses because each is the object of the verb "find out".
     

    Adelch

    Member
    Farsi
    The first is a relative clause. It modifies the noun "person" and therefore functions as an adjective, so you could call it an adjective clause.
    The other two are noun clauses because each is the object of the verb "find out".
    Isn't the third one "object of a preposotion"?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Isn't the third one "object of a preposotion"?
    The clause is not "whom this knife belongs" but "to whom this knife belongs". Here you need to think of "to whom" as a single pronoun. English isn't very strong on declensions, but ordinarily "whom" on its own would be in the accusative case, and "to whom" is the dative-case version.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    The first is a relative clause. It modifies the noun "person" and therefore functions as an adjective, so you could call it an adjective clause.
    "Whose knife this is" is a relative clause, yes, but what is "the person whose knife this is"? A noun phrase, isn't it?
     
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