How to differentiate college students from high school students

Alfred001

Senior Member
English - American
I'm working on a film festival and we are accepting submissions from college students, but not from high school students and I am having a hard time making that clear in the submission guidelines in an elegant way.

Right now I have "We accept applications from students of institutions of higher learning" which sounds weird and clunky and unwieldy. "College students", on the other hand, sounds too informal.

Is there some other way I could do this?
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    We accept applications from students enrolled in a four year college or university.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm working on a film festival and we are accepting submissions from college students, but not from high school students and I am having a hard time making that clear in the submission guidelines in an elegant way.

    Right now I have "We accept applications from students of institutions of higher learning" which sounds weird and clunky and unwieldy. "College students", on the other hand, sounds too informal.
    There's nothing informal about "college students," but you have a problem greater than that if you're really restrictive, since "college student" is open to wide interpretation. In other words you'd have to provide a tight definition somewhere even for your clunky version.

    Besides the above examples of problems:
    • Does it include graduate students?
    • I've graduated from college, but Im studying Portuguese in a non-credit course at a local community college. Can I enter? and if not, why not?
    "We accept applications from students of :eek: institutions of higher learning"
    And, by the way, I don't think you'll find many students who study institutions of higher learning, but you'll many who study at those institutions.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
     

    Alfred001

    Senior Member
    English - American
    And, by the way, I don't think you'll find many students who study institutions of higher learning, but you'll many who study at those institutions.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
    Do others agree that "students of institutions of higher learning" is wrong?
     

    Alfred001

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Might I say "we accept applications from undergraduate and graduate students" or would that be odd?

    Does everyone think "college students" doesn't sound too informal for a document written in a formal tone?

    That would exclude students attending two-year community colleges.
    Also, the problem is that we're in Europe and I'm not sure all the countries we receive applications from have their higher ed sorted out according to Bologna, so I don't really know what all the possible degree lengths are. Furthermore, even in my country there are outlier programs that have a 4 + 1 system (Bologna is typically 3+2).

    We are accepting student applicants with a high school degree or higher.
    But this would imply that they are no longer a student, if they already have an above high school degree.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    We are accepting student applicants with a high school degree or higher.
    But this would imply that they are no longer a student, if they already have an above high school degree.
    Notice "Student applicants" :)

    (So much simpler in BE :D You are not a student until you have finished (high) school and have started further education)
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suggest you use 'further education' in your description. Being 'in Europe' makes a big difference! This is like tertiary education but not formal. It's anything beyond secondary education.
    Do you really want to exclude students who are taking further education courses such as those of a vocational nature which do not earn degrees? I expect you mean 'college' and university. Many people do full or part-time vocational courses at local colleges. I would imagine you have a lower age limit in mind too, like above 18. Some people have not followed a conventional education path - mature students for example and those retraining.
    ( I have a student ID card and get discounts on that although I'm only doing a few hours of courses a week!)

    You need to cover all eventualities even if there's a long list of what you will accept and what you won't. Otherwise you'll get unsuitable applications and waste a lot of everybody's time.
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Do others agree that "students of institutions of higher learning" is wrong?
    Wrong, only in that it is sufficiently ambiguous to be confusing.

    If you are taking violin lessons, is that "higher learning"? Karate lessons? Dance school?

    It lacks the specificity that you are seeking.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you want to be absolutely clear use the International Standard Classification of Education.
    But that leaves out Deep Springs College which teaches manual labor; the Simmons School of Embalmers (football team "The bombers"), and (unfortunately now defunct) the Oregon College of Arts & Crafts. I'm not certain that any of these meet international Standards, or if any of them are still in business. But they had serious students at all of them.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top