How to pronounce A > B, A < B

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PulauPandan

Senior Member
Indonesian
Hi, how do you pronounce A > B and B < A? Can I pronounce A is more/bigger than B, and B is less/smaller than A. I didn't find the threads about this. May be I don't know the key words. Thanks to you all.
 
  • e174043

    Senior Member
    Turkish,Azerbaijani
    more than,higher than , less than
    It depends on what you are measuring. My Canadian teacher were saying more than and less than generally.
    But I'm not sure if I remember correctly:)
     

    PulauPandan

    Senior Member
    Indonesian
    A < B = A is less than B

    A > B = A is greater than B

    A < x < B = x is between A and B
    Thank you, A < x < B = A is less than x and x is less than B/ A is less than x and B/ A and x are less than B. Are they correct? 'x is between A and B' is not so clear to me. I don't know which is greater and less.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    A < x < B
    I would read this one: "x is greater than A and less than B."

    Brioche's suggested "between" means the same thing, but in contexts in which we use these symbols, I have always heard it read out formally.
     

    PulauPandan

    Senior Member
    Indonesian
    I would read this one: "x is greater than A and less than B."

    Brioche's suggested "between" means the same thing, but in contexts in which we use these symbols, I have always heard it read out formally.
    Thank you, Cagey. I think this is better, clearer and more understandable. I would prefer this one.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Depending on the mathematical context, i.e. the type of calculation or proof you're doing, you sometimes might want to be more specific and say:

    A > B : A is strictly greater than B
    A < B : A is strictly less than B

    This wording rules out the possibility that A = B. In the case where it's possible that A = B, we use ≥ and ≤, and we say:

    A ≥ B : A is greater than or equal to B
    A ≤ B : A is less than or equal to B

    As for A < x < B, you can say either A is less than x is less than B (yes, it's a run-on sentence, but that's how we say it), or x is (lies) between A and B. Note, however, that the latter wording is ambiguous: it can mean either A < x < B or or B < x < A.

    If you have A ≤ x ≤ B, then you cannot say that x lies between A and B because it's possible that x = A and/or x = B.
     
    Last edited:

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    more than,higher than , less than
    It depends on what you are measuring. My Canadian teacher were saying more than and less than generally.
    But I'm not sure if I remember correctly:)
    Sure, this may be the case in informal writing. For example, in my personal notebook, I might write any of the following:

    Internet: May > April (Internet was more expensive in May than in April)
    Led Zeppelin > The Who (Led Zeppelin is better than The Who)
    Jennifer > Ashley (Jennifer is more attractive than Ashley) :D

    In informal shorthand, it all depends on the writer. Train > Bus, depending on who writes it, the context, etc. can mean any of the following:

    - the train is more expensive than the bus
    - the train takes longer than the bus
    - the train is better than the bus
    - etc.

    Even in mathematical/scientific contexts, we can be sloppy sometimes. I might write, for example, car A > car B, and that might mean "car A is heavier than car B" (the weight of car A is greater than that of car B), or "car A is travels faster than car B" (the speed of car A is greater than that of car B), etc.
     
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