How to read a score of e.g 5/5 [exam grade]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by AntiScam, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. AntiScam

    AntiScam Senior Member

    Tripoli-Libya
    Arabic
    Hello,
    How to read a score of e.g 5/5?
    It would be great to mention the other ways other than the most common one.
     
  2. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Cheshire
    English / England
    That’s full marks. Or five out of five.
     
  3. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    :thumbsup: I agree. Unless you mean a score in, say, a football match, with each team scoring 5 goals?
     
  4. AntiScam

    AntiScam Senior Member

    Tripoli-Libya
    Arabic
    Thanks suzi and hyperpresto.
    In the context of exams, that is how I have always said. However, I have heard some non-native speakers say 4 on 5 and I might have heard 4 over 5 but I could be mistaken.

    By the way is American English any different?
     
  5. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    “Four over five” might be a way of saying a fraction when teaching fractions and multiplication etc, but not when referring to scores/marks.
     
  6. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    I think 'full marks' may be more BE; we do say"five out of five". For sports, "five-all".
     
  7. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    Yes, in BE, 'full marks' is a standard for any similar 'score' - 5 out of 5, 10 out of 10, 27 out of 27 etc.

    And for sports, 'five five' or, more likely, 'five all'.
     
  8. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    What game?

    If it is baseball then it would be "five to five" (the same score for each opposing team).

    I don't recall ever seeing a sports score notated like that.
     
  9. Uncle Jack

    Uncle Jack Senior Member

    Cumbria, UK
    British English
    In a film review or something similar:
    'Five out of five'
    'Five stars' (stars are always out of five, except for one or two obtuse publications)

    In football (soccer, or rugby union for that matter) it would be 'five-five' or 'five-all'
    In cricket it would be 'five for five' (congratulations to the side bowling!)
    All of these would usually be written '5-5'
     
  10. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Yes, either written out as "five to five" or "5 - 5". (Or 29 to 29 as shown below):

    [​IMG]
     
  11. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    :tick: Well spotted, U J!

    Addendum: And you, Pack! (P.S., It seems you keep newspapers for a long time! :))
     
  12. Glenfarclas Senior Member

    Chicago
    English (American)
    You really need to tell us what kind of score you're talking about: a score on an exam, or a score in a sport or game?

    And I'm happy to report that OHIO STATE ROUTS MICHIGAN was 50–14. :)
     
  13. dojibear

    dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - Northeast US
    Which do you mean? You didn't explain:

    1. two teams, each has a score of 5 right now

    2. one person took a test, and got 5 out of 5 answers correct

    3. we rated the film 5 stars. our max rating is 5 stars
     
  14. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    For an exam, we could also call 'five out of five', '100 out of 100', etc. "a perfect score". (This would work for archery, shooting, biathlon (which includes shooting), diving, gymnastics, etc. competitions, too.)
     
  15. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would be more likely to say "five of five."
     
  16. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I've never heard that version. There is a non-standard version that you might hear in India and South-east Asia that I might just include for information - not as any kind of recommendation at all - 'five upon five'.

    Here's a newspaper article about someone's comment on her plastic surgery, and she uses both modes of expressing the marks awarded:
    "Before my eyelid surgery, I would say I am 70 or 80 upon 100," she said, "Now, I totally look Eurasian, I feel like I am a 90 out of 100."
    Singapore blogger has fifth plastic surgery op 9 months after giving birth
     
  17. ain'ttranslationfun? Senior Member

    US English
    By the way, AS, what did you mean in your OP by "the most common one"?
     

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