How to say that I acquired some information without specifying how exactly I did that?

aush

Member
Russian
A person says to me: 'kittens are cute'.

Next, I'm talking to another person: 'I heard kittens are cute'.

So, if I want to stress out, that it's not my opinion or an idea I've come up by myself, but for whatever reason I don't want to specify how did I acquire this information, I can say 'I heard...'. But if it's a more formal environment, like I'm writing a letter to my manager, I feel like I have to say it differently, for example:

'I've got to know that kittens are cute, so ...'

Is the 'get to know' the phrase you most commonly use to describe that there was something you didn't know and at some point you've discovered it and now it is a part of your knowledge?
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I would avoid "I have got to.." as that implies "I am obliged to." it should be "I have gotten to know" but, personally I would not say that.
    You could say "I have learned/learnt that... / I have been informed that .. / It has come to my attention that.. / I have been advised that..
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    • I recently heard
    • I recently read
    • Someone told me
    • I am quoting an unnamed source

    Kittens are cute, but I recently heard that they can transmit cat scratch fever.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    The passive of tell. "I am told that . . . ". This says that you have been informed (also a possibility) without giving a source f the information. It is very common.
     

    aush

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you for the examples! Is this one correct and appropriate too?

    "It was brought to my attention that ..."

    Because I like how neutral does it sound.
     

    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    "It was brought to my attention that ..."
    This is also correct, but fairly formal.

    It has been / was brought to my attention. The choice of tenses depends on the situation.

    Another option: Kittens are cute, but I understand they can transmit cat scratch fever (Thanks, Packard)
    Because I like how neutral does it sound.
    Here you don't need the auxiliary does: Because I like how neutral it sounds
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top