How to tell a defaulter customer to pay me?

< Previous | Next >

Mister Hyde

New Member
Portuguese
Hello everybody,
First of all, congratulations! That's just the first time I'm at this forum and I have already found many interesting posts.

I'm dubious about some terms, I work for the AR (accounts receivable) of a big company and I have to contact the defaulter customers, so they pay me its arrears.

My question comes when I have to tell through my international reports about what I have been doing for those arrears. Since I have got in that company, I use the term "Pushing customer" meaning I have been in contact with the customers to get paid, is that what you as native and/or English super student would say?

Tell me if I'm right:
I'm pushing the customer = I'm asking the customer to pay its overdue invoices = I'm collecting the customer's arrears ?

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    All these sound normal to me. I do think you need a "for payment" element in there:

    I'm chasing the customer for payment.
    I'm pressing the customer for payment.
    I'm pushing the customer for payment.


    Welcome to the forum ... where we never push for payment. :)
     

    MrYeahbut

    Senior Member
    USA- English
    As Copyright says, 'I'm pressing the customer for payment' sounds very natural to me

    Also, 'Defaulter' is not really a term I have ever heard. I would say,

    ... and I have to contact the customers who are in default so they pay what is in arrears.
     

    Mister Hyde

    New Member
    Portuguese
    I have read in another forum as follows:

    Debtor = a customer, which has debts to pay me (not overdue);
    Defaulter = a customer, which debts are in arrears.

    What do you think about it?
     

    MrYeahbut

    Senior Member
    USA- English
    I have read in another forum as follows:

    Debtor = a customer, which has debts to pay me (not overdue);
    Defaulter = a customer, which debts are in arrears.

    What do you think about it?

    Yes, defaulter is indeed a correct word. It just seems awkward to me to use 'defaulter customer'. I would still say 'customer in default'

    You can wait to see what others might have to say about this.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have read in another forum as follows:

    Debtor = a customer, which has debts to pay me (not overdue);
    Defaulter = a customer, which debts are in arrears.

    What do you think about it?
    I wouldn't use debtor for a customer who owes me money -- I would call him a customer (with a credit line).
    And I wouldn't use defaulter for a customer who has failed to meet his payment schedule -- I would call him a customer who is behind in his payments.

    A little respect, please. :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Seems a little rough to me ... these are all your customers; your business depends on them. I would only use defaulter for someone I thought was wilfully ignoring his obligations for a long period of time. (Actually, I would never use defaulter -- I would probably think up some other unprintable word that showed my displeasure. :))
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If these people will pay eventually, perhaps after you ask them more than once, they're slow payers. A defaulter doesn't pay at all. (You can also call them deadbeats.)
     

    Mister Hyde

    New Member
    Portuguese
    I see what both of you mean, it's for someone who never pays me. Yeap, you are right, that's not my case, they are my beloved customers hahahah, but some of them are really slow payers =XThank you very much for healing my doubts!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In BE, defaulter is someone who either has not paid his debt so far, or, of whom it can be assumed that he will never pay. Those who have not yet paid are also described as delinquent -Failing in, or neglectful of, a duty or obligation; defaulting; faulty;
    .
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top