How to type numerals, diacritical marks, special letters for transliteration

  • cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    There's a simpler way to put the diacritical marks :
    shift+q = fat7a
    shift+w = tanwiin belfat7a

    shift+e = damma
    shift+r = tanwiin beldam

    shift+a = kasra
    shift+s = tanwiin belkasr

    shift+x = sukuun

    shift+` (the key beside the "1") = shadda
    When needing to put shadda + another mark, we put the shadda first.

    I think this is easier than going each time to the insert menu, then choosing the symbol.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Can someone write Arabic without Arabic keyboard ? You mean you insert all the letters ?!:eek:
    Well, i didn't know that. Seems things are much easier in here :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I don't always insert; I use the website (now available in the resources thread) with the virtual Arabic keyboard; then I copy and paste. I don't have an Arabic keyboard on my computer; actually, at this point, my computer is not even functional.

    I use the insert feature for the diactritics only.

    Jonathan, that responds to your suggestion as well. It's not a matter of not knowing where the keys are or not having stickers for the Arabic letters on my keyboard; I simply don't have the Arabic keyboard installed.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I'm missing a CD. You need a special CD to install keyboards with "complex" characters.
     

    Tajabone

    Senior Member
    French, Berber (Kabyle), Arabic (classical and dialectal)
    You can use virtual keyboards as well. By the way, the "Arabic" numbers are not used in North Africa (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia).

    Bye !
     

    Abu Rashid

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    When you switch to the Arabic keyboard, the normal Roman numbers just come up
    Actually the numbers which come up are the "normal Arabic numbers". 1234567890 are actually called the Arabic Numerals

    Roman Numerals look like this: I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X

    I think what you mean are the Hindi Numerals أرقام هندية.
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The Sanskrit digits were borrowed by the Persians, and from the Persians by the Arabs who gave them the shape they have in Arabic. Italians, then all Western nations, borrowed the digits from the Arabs, hence in their Arabic forms, and gave them the new shapes used in Europe and from there all over the world (except Arab countries that use their own).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I think we all knew what Linguist meant, so there's no need to get semantically picky. :p

    Linguist, it drives me crazy that the default characters are Arabic numerals instead of Arabic numbers! I don't even know of an option to change the default or even to toggle between the two. The only option through Word is - as Marc said - to use "Insert Symbol," which can of course get tedious if you are working with many numbers.

    If anyone has any better suggestions, I'd be happy to hear them!
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    Not to be "picky" I know أرقام =numbers but I have always seen اعداد for Hindi numerals. Can we use both?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Great resource! I have added it to our sticky.

    It would be even cooler, though, if there was an option like that in Word!
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Elroy, open a Word Document and do the following:

    TOOLS --- > OPTIONS --- > LANGUAGES --- >

    Scroll down a little bit and choose

    GENERAL

    NUMBERS

    You will find four options:

    Choose

    CONTEXT
    Please let me know if it works
     

    Abu Rashid

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Goto "Tools / Options / Complex Scripts" tab

    You'll see a heading at the bottom "General"

    On the left is a label "Numeral", and on the right is a drop down listbox with Arabic, Hindi, Context etc.

    I am guessing if you change it to Hindi, it'll always use these numerals, if you change it to context, then it'll use them whenever you're using an Arabic font.

    I'm using Office XP btw.

    Thanks for altering us to that akh ayed.
     

    SalamSalam

    New Member
    English
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    Assalamu 'alaikum,

    I was wondering, how do you type the following on a computer:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/Basmala.svg

    I'm referring to the S in B'ism, how it's kind of elongated. I've seen this around the internet, typed, but how do people do it on keyboard? Is there a specific keyboard shortcut to it or something? Does anyone here know?

    Thanks in advance.
     

    azeid

    Senior Member
    العربية
    و عليكم الســـــــــــــــــــــلام و رحمة الله و بركاتـــــــــــــــــــه
    :)
    Type the letter and then press SHIFT+J.​
     

    Jarrex

    New Member
    English
    Hi, I don't mean to resurrect a dead thread, but this is one of the top search results for Arabic Keyboard with numbers. There is a better option than using an online keyboard.

    It doesn't let me post URL's so here is the plain text version:
    ryanglynn{DOT}com/2010/12/06/arabic-keyboard-layout-finished-programming/

    this website has a brand new Arabic keyboard layout that when installed will allow you to switch between Arabic and English and the Arabic will type the Arabic characters in all windows and programs.

    Once again, sorry for resurrecting a dead thread, but I just thought I would help everyone else out.
     

    Serafín33

    Senior Member
    Completely agree. Here's a couple of links to download it from. (I don't think I'm not violating any forum rules here, am I...?)

    I must say I find it very strange that default keyboards are generally not well suited for the languages in question. The Latin American Spanish one doesn't have "ª", the superscript feminine mark; nor does any Spanish keyboard or the English one have "—", the dash; nor do Arabic keyboards have <ٰ>,‎ الألف الخنجرية...
     

    Biebabeloeba

    New Member
    Dutch, French, English,
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    As-salaamu aleikum,

    There is a language course (book with cds/cassettes) for egyption-arabic, titled "Kullu tamam". But in this book there are used some fonetics signs to indicate a glottal stop, etc. How can I type these signs in Word?
     

    kifaru

    Senior Member
    English
    Do you want to know how to type it in Arabic or how to make the symbol with a western style keyboard. I usually see an apostrophe (') or 'okina (an inverted apostrophe) indicate ع when reading transliterated texts.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    The symbol used in "Kullu Tamam" to represent the glottal stop looks like a backwards 'c' ( ɔ ) superscripted.

    Now, I don't know the Unicode for this, but what you could do (for any text you want to mirror) is use a text mirror function (such as this one), type in the 'c', then copy and paste the mirrored symbol on a Word document and then superscript it.

    I've already done step one, so you can just copy and paste 'ɔ' into your Word document.

    As Kifaru noted the use of an apostrophe (') is quite common to represent the glottal stop. It may be easier to use that.
     
    Last edited:

    clevermizo

    Senior Member
    English (USA), Spanish
    Yes, and there's always Charmap. (Start>Run>"charmap"). You can also, within MSWord of course, manually go "Insert>Symbol" and insert whatever Unicode character for your fontset that you'd like. A font like Arial Sans Unicode will have all the normal "funny characters" like ɔ and you can subsequently set it to superscript and subscript.

    Personally, I like to have the superscript and subscript easily accessible as buttons on the toolbar, so if you go up to your Font formatting toolbar there will be a down-arrow and you can select "Add or Remove Buttons" to customize the toolbar.

    Finally, if you are a little more computer savvy, I recommend downloading for free the Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator which allows you to edit your keyboard and add special characters, usually via the Alt, Ctl or Win keys. I've done this with my keyboard ānð þăt's why ʕI cän ťypȩ likeʔ tħis sø easilý.:D:D You could even add superscripted or subscripted c or
    ɔ this way (which is what I presume Kullu Tamam uses for ʕayin and glottal stop). By the way I prefer ʕ and ʔ because I don't like how superscripted characters make them feel less like "real" consonants. :)
     

    Serafín33

    Senior Member
    Yes, and there's always Charmap. (Start>Run>"charmap"). You can also, within MSWord of course, manually go "Insert>Symbol" and insert whatever Unicode character for your fontset that you'd like.
    MS Word Insert/Symbol?? At least in my version of MS Office (the 2007 English-language release), I only have access to a very very small number of characters, very much working only for some European languages. I don't have access to some symbols used in Kullu Tamām such as ‹ḷ› or ‹ṃ› (but maybe they're accessible in other versions).

    What I would suggest is that you download Babelmap, which allows you to crawl through the entirety of Unicode, even if you don't have any fonts for the corresponding ranges.

    Biebabeloeba: so what I'd suggest is that you use Babelmap for getting the symbols while using Microsoft's Keyboard Layout Keyboard to create your own keyboard. It makes life a lot easier.

    As some final advice, if you use Babelmap, you'll find all the non-English symbols you need at the Unicode blocks called "IPA Extensions", "Latin Extended Additional", and "Latin Extended A".
    clevermizo said:
    By the way I prefer ʕ and ʔ because I don't like how superscripted characters make them feel less like "real" consonants. :)
    I totally agree!
     

    clevermizo

    Senior Member
    English (USA), Spanish
    MS Word Insert/Symbol?? At least in my version of MS Office (the 2007 English-language release), I only have access to a very very small number of characters, very much working only for some European languages. I don't have access to some symbols used in Kullu Tamām such as ‹ḷ› or ‹ṃ› (but maybe they're accessible in other versions).
    I don't know about Office 2007 - but in previous versions "Symbol" from the Insert menu lets you choose from among any of the characters for a particular font.
     
    Last edited:

    Serafín33

    Senior Member
    Ohh, thanks for the explanation! I see that is how it works.

    Well, in any case, Babelmap has the option to automatically select a combination of fonts-per-Unicode-block so that you can have the most characters in view, without needing to change fonts to find particular characters (the option can be found at Configure/Auto).
     

    Bilbo Baggins

    Senior Member
    American English
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    Hi,

    I hope the moderators don't delete this post as my question is not grammatical in nature.

    Where are dagger alif and waSla on the Arabic keyboard?

    Thanks.
     

    Gaed

    Member
    Arabic
    Here are the hamza that I can write on keyboard:
    H ا
    H+shift أ
    Y+shift إ
    C ؤ
    X ء
    Z ئ

    Sorry if this did not help
     
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