How to use "See you"

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ilikeenglish

Senior Member
South Africa
I often mix or interchangeably use the two phrases "good-bye" and "see you". Because in Chinese, the word has both senses.

According to the dictionary, "good-bye" is used when one is leaving others or being left by others; while "see you" is used when one knows he will see the other again.

I am not sure whether in your natives' daily life, you distinguish between the two situations.

Besides, I sometimes added "good-bye" after I had said "see you". (Of course, I waited for the other's response. Then I took the turn to say the last word "good-bye".) Is it OK to repeat in this instance and also with two meanings contained in it?

I wonder, if to say a wish or show politeness, can we also say "see you" when actually we are not sure whether we can meet with the person we are talking to (e.g. an interviewer, a friend departing from us, etc.) in the future.
 
  • chat9998

    Senior Member
    English, US
    Hi again,

    This is kind of the same as your previous question, so it may get deleted!

    But, in answer to your question, yes... you certainly can say, either or both! I have found that some people use "See you," almost as a "mean" farewell, as if by saying it, they mean they won't see someone again! Both can be used, or either, though!

    God bless,
    Jeff
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Hi - I use them interchangebly. It would be "neat" to make a distinction along the lines that "goodbye" is more final than "see you" which can literally mean - have sight of. In real life, however, we don't. I've even heard a blind friend say it, and he never literally sees me!

    Is French the same "au revoir" means until we see again, doesn't it?
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Hi - I use them interchangebly. It would be "neat" to make a distinction along the lines that "goodbye" is more final than "see you" which can literally mean - have sight of. In real life, however, we don't. I've even heard a blind friend say it, and he never literally sees me!

    Is French the same "au revoir" means until we see again, doesn't it?
    See you is short form for: I will see you later/again/tomorrow/etc..

    You can also say I'll see ya/you. I put the informal "ya" because you wouldn't ever really say "see you" in a formal context anyway.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    'see you around' is a similar familar expression with no particular connotation as to whether you will or not see the other person but that it is quite likely you will, by chance.
     
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