How to use 'when it comes to ~'

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jihoon

Senior Member
korean
We can bring up the topic of anything using 'when It comes to 'sentence pattern. So here's a sentence.

When it comes to where I study,

But, the problem that I'm facing is I have no idea what exactly I should talk about where I study. I think the following are possible, but I don't know if it is.

1. the place that I prefer to study at. at a coffee shop or at home.

2. How silent it is to focus on.

3. How close it is from my home.

So I'd like to know how I can choose topic so that the whole story makes sens.
 
  • quillerbee

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I would not use "when it comes to" to introduce a topic. Instead, I use it after "but" to emphasize differences.

    I enjoy all kinds of music, but when it comes to movies, I only watch comedies.
    She is relaxed about her housekeeping, but when it comes to her garden, she is obsessive.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, jihoon.

    You can use anything that makes sense when you are talking about the place where you study.

    All your topics are possible. You will have to put those ideas into words that fit after the phrase. Here is one possibility: When it comes to where I study, I like a little noise. That is why I like to study in the coffee shop.

    cross-posted with quillerbee.
     

    jihoon

    Senior Member
    korean
    I would not use "when it comes to" to introduce a topic. Instead, I use it after "but" to emphasize differences.

    I enjoy all kinds of music, but when it comes to movies, I only watch comedies.
    She is relaxed about her housekeeping, but when it comes to her garden, she is obsessive.
    I think you are right. we already have a topic and there are a couple of parts of the topic. after we finish talking about a part of the topic, and when we need to talk about another part of the topic, we can use 'when it comes to' right?
     

    quillerbee

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Almost. I think it is more to show something that is special and different, especially about people -- what they like and how they behave.

    I can't think of good examples of this usage in non-people topics:

    "Most bread is white, but when it comes to brown bread…" what? I just doesn't work.
     

    quillerbee

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    My teacher is very relaxed about talking in class, but when it comes to prayer time -- watch out!

    or animals:

    My dog is very nice to cats, but when it comes to rats and mice, he is a killer.
     

    quillerbee

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Let's try another one:

    In this hotel, the rooms are all very clean, but when it comes to the kitchen, it is filthy.

    No, I would not say this. I would say:

    In this hotel, the rooms are all very clean, but the kitchen is filthy.

    I have to conclude that this usage is best for pointing out ways in which people (or animals) have strong tendencies or feelings.
     

    jihoon

    Senior Member
    korean
    Let's try another one:

    In this hotel, the rooms are all very clean, but when it comes to the kitchen, it is filthy.

    No, I would not say this. I would say:

    In this hotel, the rooms are all very clean, but the kitchen is filthy.

    I have to conclude that this usage is best for pointing out ways in which people (or animals) have strong tendencies or feelings.
    wow... I really appreciate you effort. Thank you very much...!!!
     
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