How to write the isolated haa2 and other letters

  • ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Whodunit said:
    EDIT: I just noticed something: Why do you write the "haa" (ه) as if it were to introduce a word (هـ)?
    If I wrote it as (ه) then it appears as number five , does not it?
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Whodunit said:
    As I can see, you are a fine and accurate writer, so it shouldn't be a problem to distinguish between ٥ and ه, should it? I think the "5" is more rotund that the "haa", right?
    I understand your point, but we never write the haa like this, it's always like this هـ thus it's clearer. At least this is how we learned it in school as natives :)
    The three forms of the letter haa2, we learned them and write them like this :
    هـ - ـهـ - ـه The first time I see it like this ه was here in the forum :)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    cherine said:
    I understand your point, but we never write the haa like this, it's always like this هـ thus it's clearer. At least this is how we learned it in school as natives :)
    The three forms of the letter haa2, we learned them and write them like this :
    هـ - ـهـ - ـه The first time I see it like this ه was here in the forum :)
    Wow, that surprises me a lot. Every grammar book I have seen so far uses ه for the "isolated haa". Does that mean you haven't known about ه for more than 30 years? :eek:
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Whodunit said:
    Wow, that surprises me a lot. Every grammar book I have seen so far uses ه for the "isolated haa". Does that mean you haven't known about ه for more than 30 years? :eek:
    I was surprised also. The four forms of the letter should all be learned. There are, after all, words in which the haa2 appears in its isolated form -- أخوه، أبوه. I see what Cherine and Ayed are saying, though, about confusion. I guess it must depend a little on context. In the context of learning the different letter forms I agree, all four forms should be presented and learned (that's how I learned them as Whodunit said, they appear in the grammar and Arabic alphabet learning books that way). Of course, there is no cause for confusion as we are talking about letters. But in a context in which confusion might occur, I guess haa2 is used in its initial form هـ so as to aviod confusion. It does appear as such on Arabic keyboards. Check here.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Josh Adkins said:
    It does appear as such on Arabic keyboards. Check here.
    Okay, where we are at it: (Our mudírs will split it anyway)

    Why do jeem (7aa/khaa) and 3ayn (ghayn) appear in their initial form as well? don't see any confusion with numbers or other letters here.

    But you are all right: If context is missing, an isolated haa and the Arabic 5 can be confused.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Why do jeem (7aa/khaa) and 3ayn (ghayn) appear in their initial form as well? don't see any confusion with numbers or other letters here.
    At first, I didn't know why, but then it dawned on me. They are that way because they are longer letters that extend below the line and all of the letters in a given row line up more or less with each other. If they were written in their isolated forms they would have to be moved and thus not be in the same line as the other letters, not to mention intruding on the English letter above it. Just a theory anyway.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    At first, I didn't know why, but then it dawned on me. They are that way because they are longer letters that extend below the line and all of the letters in a given row line up more or less with each other. If they were written in their isolated forms they would have to be moved and thus not be in the same line as the other letters, not to mention intruding on the English letter above it. Just a theory anyway.
    I share your theory. Nevertheless, the same should have happened to siin, qaaf, and yaa, because they reach below the line as well. Then, I'd prefer this kind of keyboard, although I'm not convinced that that one is a traditional Arabic keyboard. :)
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Whodunit said:
    I share your theory. Nevertheless, the same should have happened to siin, qaaf, and yaa, because they reach below the line as well. Then, I'd prefer this kind of keyboard, although I'm not convinced that that one is a traditional Arabic keyboard. :)
    That puts a kink inmy theory. But it could be that since those letters don't extend as far as the others, they are included in their isolated forms. I really don't know.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Regarding ه:

    We are all familiar with this form, of course. We know how to spell أخاه, for example.

    It's just that in everyday writing it is conventional to write هـ when the letter is isolated - when you're filling out a crossword puzzle for example, or when you're translating a sticky ;). I don't know why we do this - Ayed's theory about similarity with the number 5 is plausible - but it certainly doesn't mean we don't know the form. :)
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Whodunit said:
    I share your theory. Nevertheless, the same should have happened to siin, qaaf, and yaa, because they reach below the line as well. Then, I'd prefer this kind of keyboard, although I'm not convinced that that one is a traditional Arabic keyboard. :)
    It's true that this keyboard is not the traditional one. Notice that there are some keys with two Arabic letters (one up and one down) which is not the case with the regular keyboards we have (like the one shown by Josh).
    I agree with Josh's theory by the way, if you take a closer look, you'll find that all the letters you've mentioned are written in a way to be set on the line (I mean they don't go below the line) : جـ - حـ - خـ - هـ - عـ - غـ - غـ - فـ - قـ - قـ - ثـ - صـ - ضـ
    Here I've copied the letters of the first line of my keyboard to show how they appear, and the same goes with the سـ - شـ .. and so on.
     
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