How was your <travel><trip><journey>?

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resoluteman

Senior Member
Azerbaijan
Travel and Journey - both have nearly the same meaning with slighly different connotations. A journey would often imply a longer (in terms of time and/or distance) trip. But I can't really understand the reason why using travel (singular) in this question - How was your travel ? - considered wrong while trip or journey instead is not ? Does it have anything to do with the connotation/suggestion that "travel" (n) has which is perhaps natives are familiar with and it contrasts sightly with trip or journey so that we don't use it in this question ? .. or all about is simply contextual relation that comes from traditional way of usage of this word?
 
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  • resoluteman

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijan
    In what context have you heard someone say "How was your travel?"
    I've seen it's marked as wrong on some grammer pages, using travel in this question, but I can't really figure out why ? how was your trip/jorney :tick: but travel:cross: - leaves me in a huge perplexity.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Travel' isn't used like that. A trip isn't the same as a journey either.
    I can't think of 'travel' as other than uncountable, and often used as an adjective, but sometimes used in the plural in specific traditional contexts.
     

    resoluteman

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijan
    'Travel' isn't used like that. A trip isn't the same as a journey either.
    I can't think of 'travel' as other than uncountable, and often used as an adjective, but sometimes used in the plural in specific traditional contexts.
    so does it mean we could say - How were your travels?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    sometimes used in the plural in specific traditional contexts.
    .
    What would 'How were your travels?' mean? If we don't use 'your travel' singular we're unlikely to use it in the plural.

    It might be used in the plural to refer to a great many trips to foreign, exotic places.
    "You've written about about your travels in Bhutan and the neighbouring countries, haven't you?"
    "R L Stevenson wrote a book called Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes.
    The word exists but it isn't useful in modern English.
     

    resoluteman

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijan
    Yes: that sounds fine to me. The singular travel is very abstract, and means the total of all the journeys that have be made by everyone, not a series of journeys made by a particular person. But we use the plural travels to refer to a person's experience of travel.
    Sorry for my late reply, I've just seen your post and that's exactly where I want to dwell on a bit more. I really find it hard to understand how singular travel could have general meaning . When I hear people saying 'your travel', I can t conceive at all how it might refer to the total amount of journey made by everyone on the earth? because there we have possesive pronoun - "yours" preceding travel which is supposed to add the sense of possesiveness to the combination, but somehow it doesn't, however, the travel as plural does this.. that's so awkward. I can't even conceive how any word with general meaning may have plural form as well. Could you possibly explain this contradiction as much as you can? Could you define the word over again so that it would be easy for me to conceive the tricky side of it, simply allow me into your brain to see how this word resonates with you and all natives.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Travel is an uncountable noun meaning travelling.

    Like all uncountable nouns, travel can be used in the plural in some special senses. Most uncountable nouns, when used in the plural, mean different kinds of .... Travels is different: it means instances of travelling, or it can, oddly, refer to a particular journey.

    Your has its normal sense here.
     

    resoluteman

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijan
    Travel is an uncountable noun meaning travelling.

    Like all uncountable nouns, travel can be used in the plural in some special senses. Most uncountable nouns, when used in the plural, mean different kinds of .... Travels is different: it means instances of travelling, or it can, oddly, refer to a particular journey.

    Your has its normal sense here.
    we can ask "how did you get that information/advice" - without worrying about if answerer would take it as personal or general information/advice, cause we know that he would understand what information we're talking about, but we can't expect the same when we ask "how was your travel" - because he would take it as if we talk about travel in general. I just can't understand the so-called generality in travel that leads you to think of travel as a total amount of journey made by everyone.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The words travel and travels are perhaps unique.
    - The word travel is used for
    1. multiple experiences, not a single trip, or
    2. The wisdom gained from travelling: Travel broadens the mind.
    - The word travels can be used of a single experience.

    Information
    is nothing like this. There is no such word as informations.
     
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