human rights vs human-rights

wantknower

New Member
Korean
Text
...........The field of international politics is, however, dominated by states and other powerful actors (such as multinational corporations) that have priorities other than human rights. It is a leading feature of the human-rights field that the governments of the world (A) proclaim ( argue ) human rights but have a variable record of implementing (B) human-rights.

In the paragraph above, (A) proclaim is very natural. What I want to know is whether “argue” can be used instead of ‘proclaim’.

In the paragraph above, you can see “human rights” and “human-rights field”. In “human-rights field”, “is ”human-rights“ adjective or noun?

3. In (B), what do you think “human-rights? one teacher said that because ”human-rights“ is an adjective, (B) is wrong. He said that it cannot be used as a noun. I think that human-rights have no problem in that place.

I appreciate your opinion.
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It is a leading feature of the human-rights field that the governments of the world (A) proclaim ( argue ) human rights but have a variable record of implementing
    Feature seems to be the wrong word there. I think you meant something like assumption. I'd write the human rights field. As to the verb, I'd use argue for or support.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    When an expression of more than one word (such as 'human rights') is used as a modifier of another noun, it is often hyphenated ('human-rights field'), but this is not necessary, and in this example I would not do it (so I'd choose to write it 'human rights field'). There are no simple rules for this, and a lot of it is personal choice.
     
    Top