husky and hard boiled

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serhatuygur

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello, as far as I know husky has two meanings, one is "low-pitched and slightly hoarse voice" and the other is "big and strong". I guess the author uses the latter meaning in the sentence below but I'd be very glad if someone can confirm or correct me. And I have a second question, is the word "hard-boiled" synonymous with "barefaced"? Thank you very much.

A bunch of Germans were cut off, hiding in some tall weeds. Christenson spotted them. “Anybody here speak German?” he called out. Webster came up. “Heraus!” he yelled. “Schnell! Hände hoch! Schnell! Schnell!” One by one, eleven Germans came out. Husky, hard-boiled, they claimed they were Poles. Christenson motioned them to the rear.

Source: Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Here "husky" means larger than average ("big and strong").

    "Hard-boiled", when used for people, means "tough". I don't see any connection to "barefaced" (not wearing a beard or mustache).
     

    serhatuygur

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Here "husky" means larger than average ("big and strong").

    "Hard-boiled", when used for people, means "tough". I don't see any connection to "barefaced" (not wearing a beard or mustache).
    Thank you dojibear. There is a meaning for hard-boiled in the WRdictionary which is cynical. In the context of such a meaning, I thought the author may mean something like a "barefaced lie" with "hard-boiled" regarding German soldiers claiming they were Poles.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    We do say "barefaced lies" to mean brazen, obvious lies. But we don't say "barefaced people" with that meaning.

    So your idea is logical, but (in this case) English isn't logical.
     
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