I´ll be right back,over,down,up,in?

sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!

I´ve come across them a few times, Could anyone exemplify the usage of them ? and Why I´ve never seen I´ll be right off?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Hello amigos!

    I´ve come across them a few times, Could anyone exemplify the usage of them ? and Why I´ve never seen I´ll be right off?

    Thanks,

    Sam:cool:
    I'll be right back - I'm coming back very soon
    I'll be right over - You've called me to come to your house and I reply that I'll be there quickly.
    I'll be right down - I'm upstairs and you are downstairs and have asked me to come down.
    I'll be right up - the opposite of the above.
    I'll be right in - I have never heard that one.
    I'll be right off - this wouldn't make any sense to me:)
     

    FC7user

    Senior Member
    US English
    I'll be right in - hardest one to explain. I think in many cases it has something to do with going to work.

    Lawyer 1, talking to a Lawyer 2 who is at home: "Bob, we have a tough case here. This witness isn't going to last long and we need to get this evidence."
    Lawyer 2: "I'll be right in." (He will travel from home to the law firm.)

    But bear in mind that it could mean other things in context.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I'll be right in - hardest one to explain. I think in many cases it has something to do with going to work.

    Lawyer 1, talking to a Lawyer 2 who is at home: "Bob, we have a tough case here. This witness isn't going to last long and we need to get this evidence."
    Lawyer 2: "I'll be right in." (He will travel from home to the law firm.)

    But bear in mind that it could mean other things in context.
    Yes, that does sound plausible. It hadn't occurred to me.:)
     

    Dr. Benway

    Senior Member
    Spain. Spanish.
    What about "I'll be right out" if someone is knocking on the door out of the bathroom you're in?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    What about "I'll be right out" if someone is knocking on the door out of the bathroom you're in?
    Yes, that's fine. If you can use the preposition to describe the slower movement or action appropriately, then you can put "right" before it in this construction to convey immediacy.
    I'll be out in a minute. -> I'll be right out.
    I'll come over tmorrow. -> I'll be right over
     

    DoctorSir

    New Member
    English
    I'll be right back - I'm coming back very soon
    I'll be right over - You've called me to come to your house and I reply that I'll be there quickly.
    I'll be right down - I'm upstairs and you are downstairs and have asked me to come down.
    I'll be right up - the opposite of the above.
    I'll be right in - I have never heard that one.
    I'll be right off - this wouldn't make any sense to me:)
    Children playing outside are often told "it's time to come inside", to which they reply I'll be right in."
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Could you also say "I'll be right downstairs/upstairs"?
    Yes. But it indicates location, not movement.

    Imagine a person sick in bed upstairs, with a family member looking after them. It would be perfectly natural to say “I’ll be right downstairs if you need me”. It’s the same usage as “Don’t worry. I’m right here”.
     
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