I´m going to home / I´m going home

  • levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    "to home" no existe en general. Es una excepción rara que va sin preposición.

    casa = home
    a/de casa = home

    I'm going/coming/leaving/getting home. (voy a/vengo a/salgo de/llego a casa)


    En casa es diferente, se traduce con "at"

    en casa = at home / at my house
    en tu casa = at your house
     

    londrespanol

    New Member
    English
    You could say "I'm going to go home" or "I'm going home", but not "I'm going to home".

    However, grammatically you could say "I'm going to my home", and "I'm going to go to my home", but not "I'm going my home" (although you would instead change the word to house e.g. "I am going to my house").
     

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    You could say "I'm going to go home" or "I'm going home", but not "I'm going to home".

    However, grammatically you could say "I'm going to my home", and "I'm going to go to my home", but not "I'm going my home" (although you would instead change the word to house e.g. "I am going to my house").

    That's interesting, because to me "going to my home" sounds funny.

    I would say "going home" or "going to my house", not "going to my home". I am sure it is said, but it sounds almost tautologous.
     

    londrespanol

    New Member
    English
    I agree levmac - I wouldn't really say "I'm going to my home" either, but grammatically it is correct. I might say something like "I'm going to return to my home, where I shall retire to my bed without hesitation" if I was trying to be overly-grandiose for a joke.

    The point I was trying to make was that by changing "home" to "my home" or "his home", you can use "to" in front of it.
    But when it's just "home", I would not.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    "to home" no existe en general. Es una excepción rara que va sin preposición.

    I think the reason for the exception is that "home" in this sense was originally not a tangible location, but rather an idea of being in your own house, with your family, etc. Of course, over time it has evolved into basically the same as "my house," but I still think the above is the reason here.
     

    irland5

    Banned
    spain spanish
    Ok,

    Thank you all very much! I have two questions about ``to´´
    Which one is the correct:
    I´m going Luigi´s home
    I´m going to Luigi´s home
    I´m going to bed
    I´m going bed

    Thanks a million =)
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would not say "Luigi's home". I'd say "luigi's house".

    In the context of "I'm going to," I agree. But the following sound perfectly natural to my American ear.

    Luigi has a beautiful home.
    We took a tour of Luigi's home.

    "Home" in modern usage has a slightly fancier feel than "house." That is why realtors talk about home sales, not house sales, and my city has an annual home tour (where you get to walk through people's homes/houses), not house tour.
     

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    A good point - if we are emphasising that the home is special in some way, we can use home. Same in BrE.
     

    chacahua

    Senior Member
    Midwestern American English
    I'd just like to add for our Spanish speakers that two other, common options could be,

    "We stopped by Luigi's / went to Luigi's last night."
    "We stopped by Luigi's place / went to Luigi's place last night."

    Es decir que basta con "Luigi's" sin "home" o "house." No está mejor dicho, sino es otra opción común. Si decimos solamente "Luigi's," en este contexto se sabe que hablamos del lugar donde vive. Lo mismo ocurre en otros contexos:

    Whose book is that?
    It's Luigi's.
    Whose house is that?
    It's Luigi's.

    Y luego, usar "place" como "house/home/apartment" también es común.
     
    Last edited:

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'd just like to add for our Spanish speakers that two other, common options could be,

    "We stopped by Luigi's / went to Luigi's last night."

    Good point. It's very common in speech. And I think it can be translated as "donde."

    I'm going to Grandma's = Voy donde mi abuela
     
    Top