I’ll bet you’ve a good cod on you; oh, you’re a bantam

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 419, chapter 18) by DH Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Malcolm said Mellors was a good cock. Then he continued…)

"……Not like that blasted Clifford! A lily-livered hound with never a fuck in him, never had. I(Malcolm) like you(Mellors), my boy, I’ll bet you’ve a good cod on you; oh, you’re a bantam, I can see that.…… "

Now I paraphrase the blue sentence as follows:
I‘m sure(=I'll bet) you've a good p e n i s with(=cod on) you; oh, you are an agressive and spirited person(=bantam)

Am I right please?
Thank you in advance
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    you've a good p e n i s with(=cod on) you
    No need for "with". That makes it sound as though you think he's got his penis in a bag. You've got a good cod = you've got a good penis. "On you" is a colloquialism meaning "as part of your body".

    But you have understood the meaning correctly.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If you don't already know the word "codpiece" look it up in a dictionary.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    On reflection, I suppose it is possible that Sir Malcolm might have been using "cod" correctly, telling Mellors that he had a fine pair of testicles.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    From Wikipedia:

    Cow cod soup is a traditional dish in Jamaican cuisine that is considered an aphrodisiac and made with bull penis (or "cod ").
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Literally, it was a bird in its original primary definition. But it's come to be used in reference to people, too. Your description above is very good as to the sense of what it means when referring to a person, except it also generally refers to someone smaller than average.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We had an earlier exhaustive discussion about 'cod'. I'm glad to know about that soup. The things one learns on this forum!
    I got the impression that cod means genitals but especially 'balls'. That would fit well here, along with bantam, a fierce sort of chicken as the books say but cock would be more like it here, wouldn't it.
    'Balls' in the sense of courage and insolence, bearing in mind Mellors' low social status. If 'cod' meant only penis,one would imagine that a codpiece would be differently shaped more like the penis gourd sheaths of Papua.
    As we always say size doesn't matter, it's metaphorical.
    If there is a variety of words in Chinese, don't translate 'cod' as 'penis', a medical and 'correct' term, which wouldn't convey the same meaning as the English slang, any more than translating 'bantam' as 'chicken' would.

    I have no idea what sort of slang 'cod' would have been in those days.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    You have the meaning right but I think you're missing in your interpretation that by comparing these men to animals (Clifford to a dog, Mellors to a rooster) Malcolm is being condescending. So it's complimentary but still also kind of insulting. I'm pretty sure it's intentional.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yes, I mean that "bantam" is both a compliment and also an insult. It's a condescending compliment "you're a good farm animal and he's a bad one" !

    It's the sort of situation where complimenting a person in such a way is also intended to show the speaker's superiority. Like if you are a college student and someone shows you how to do a simple multiplication, you already know how, you do it easily, and they compliment how good you are at it - it's somewhat insulting because it's condescending, even though it's a compliment... it's like that, sort of.
     
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