I’ll treat you to <lunch, foot massage,…> [usage]

csicska

Senior Member
hungarian
Hello. Could you please tell me if I used the phrase "I’ll treat you to something" correctly?

Examples:

I’ll treat you to dinner. = We will go out for dinner, someone else will cook it and I’ll pay the bill.
I’ll invite you for dinner. = You will come to my place, I (or my wife,…) will cook it and you will eat it if it’s good.
I’ll treat you to a foot massage. = You (or maybe we both) will go for a foot massage, someone else will give it to you and I’ll pay the bill.
I’ll give you a foot massage. = We will agree on some place (my place, your place, at work,..) where I will give you a foot massage.

Thank you.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wouldn't use 'treat you' unless I meant that I was paying for the service of others for us both. I'd say I'll cook dinner for you, I'll give you a foot massage. My reasoning is that the cooking and the foot massage do not involve payment or reciprocity.
     

    csicska

    Senior Member
    hungarian
    Thank you. So you wouldn't use "treat you" if you were paying for the service of others only for them (meaning that you would not use that service and would stay at home, at work,...)?
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Usually one says to a companion, "My treat." That means the bill for both will be paid by me. Hermione made this point, above.

    If I'm taking my teen to buy boots, I would not say "My treat": rather, "I'll handle the bill."

    Thank you. So you wouldn't use "treat you" if you were paying for the service of others only for them (meaning that you would not use that service and would stay at home, at work,...)?
     
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