I’m afraid o’ things - I don’t care (by Lawrence)

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 152) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):

"But are you afraid for yourself?"(by Connie)
"…… I’m afraid O’ things."(by Mellors)
He gave a curious backward jerk of his head, indicating the outer world.
……
‘Nay, I don’t care,’ he said.

I think "I'm afraid of things" is contradictory with "I don't care".

Could you please give me some explanations?
Thank you in advance
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Haven't you ever made a decision that isn't entirely logical and that you know will have bad consequences for you and others, but you do it just the same, simply because you feel you must, and because the other person wants you to? :D That's how Mellors was feeling. I think.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you.
    Haven't you ever made a decision that isn't entirely logical and that you know will have bad consequences for you and others, but you do it just the same, simply because you feel you must, and because the other person wants you to? :D That's how Mellors was feeling. I think.
    But I'm still not clear about it. Do you mean "haven't you ever made a decision that is entirely logical"?
    In the text he is literally contradicting himself: "Nay". He changed his mind.
    I think this is plausible. Mellors just changed his mind temporarily because of his sudden sex impulse

    By the way, this website has been blocked by the evil government recently. So I'm using a special software to visit it. But it doesn't work well, so I can't communicate with you in time. Sorry for it.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    No long, I mean that sometimes we don't make rational decisions and we may veer between two or more courses of action. I wouldn't say we change our mind when we do that - it's just that we often have conflicting aims and desires at the same time. If Constance had agreed with Mellors that it was a silly idea to go on with their affair, he would probably have agreed with her - and maybe gone away to work somewhere else.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Hehe. I understand it now. The "you" in "Haven't you ever made a decision that isn't entirely logical and that you know will have bad consequences for you and others" refers to me rather than Connie or Mellors.(I thought it was a dialogue between Connie and Mellors.)

    And in fact, you two have the similar opinion I think.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Sorry for causing confusion long; yes, I wanted you to put yourself in that hypothetical situation.
     
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