I’ve got lodging in a bit of an old cottage in Engine Row very decent

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 442, chapter 19) by DH Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Mellors got a job on a farm. The following is what he said in his letter to Connie.…)

I’ve got lodging in a bit of an old cottage in Engine Row very decent. The man is engine-driver at High Park, tall, with a beard, and very chapel. The woman is a birdy bit of a thing who loves anything superior. King’s English and allow-me! all the time.

The blue sentence is quite confusing to me. I take got lodging to be lived, but I don't know whether decent(meaning proper or kind?) modifies cottate or the street Engine Row(=a row of Engines)

Could you tell me how to make sense of it please?
Thank you in advance
 
  • MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    I've rented a room in a cottage. The cottage is rather old, but it's all very nice and quite satisfactory for my needs.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you. But I feel the Engine Row street is likely to mean a street, which looks like a row of engines. And Lawrence is implying that the place is highly industralized by Engine Row.
    Is that possible please?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I’ve got lodging in a bit of an old cottage in Engine Row very decent. The man is engine-driver at High Park, tall, with a beard, and very chapel. The woman is a birdy bit of a thing who loves anything superior. King’s English and allow-me! all the time.

    The blue sentence is quite confusing to me. I take got lodging to be lived, but I don't know whether decent(meaning proper or kind?) modifies cottate or the street Engine Row(=a row of Engines)
    It's not "got lodging," it's "have got lodging."

    I've got lodging = I have lodging = I am living/staying/lodging.

    As Julian said, Engine Row is just the name of the street -- it could just as well have been Engine Street, or Engine Lane, or Engine Road, or.... It might have gotten it's name from being where several engine-drivers (AE engineers) lived. It might even have been constructed for that purpose.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I’ve got lodging in a bit of an old cottage in Engine Row very decent.
    I’ve got lodging: I have found accommodation, that is, I have rented a room.
    in a bit of an old cottage: in a small old terraced house
    in Engine Row: the name of the terraced street
    very decent: very clean and well kept.

    I am sure 'I've got' means 'I have obtained' and the present perfect tense means it is very recent: he is telling her his latest news.

    'Engine Row' indicates this is a street in a mining village: a village built to house pitmen (mine workers).
    Each mine had a steam engine to power the winding gear and pumps. Presumably this street led up to the engine house.

    A row is a terraced street, that is, a street of houses all built together: no gaps between the houses.

    This blog has a picture of such a street (Glasshoughton pit buildings), with the pit winding gear on the left and the engine house out of view to the left, beyond the slag heap.

    Each door in that street belongs to a separate house, showing that these houses are 'two up, two down'.
    Each house has two floors, and each floor has one room at the front and one at the back. This is the type of house Lawrence means by 'a bit of a cottage'.
     
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