" I acquire this land "

  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well . . .

    Yes, in the context of land, 'acquire' means "purchase, buy". But you wouldn't use the plain present tense. You could say, 'I acquired (= bought, purchased) this land', or 'I want to acquire (= buy, purchase) this land)', but not 'I acquire/buy/purchase this land'. Plain present tense is either habitual ("I often/repeatedly buy") or a proclamation ("I hereby make legal the purchase of this land").
     

    GerardM

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi entangledbank,

    You're right that I hesitated and just understood that "I acquire this land" might be said by a guy showing to a friend the land he is about to purchase (when the papers are ready and the deed is transferred).

    ~~ edit
    As an English speaking member, please could you write some words about the differences b/w to acquire & to purchase/to buy.

    I PMed lugovets about this but I would like natives' confirmation (I mean connotation of snobbery or dubious means).
    Thanks.
     
    Last edited:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Okay, I suppose 'acquired' is broader than 'bought'. If your great-uncle left it to you in his will, you would also say you acquired the land.
     

    GerardM

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi everyone,

    Sorry to come again with a few new words but the more I think of it, the more I see differences...

    To acquire is a bit more formal than to purchase/to buy.
    To acquire is also more general as the word would be used also when "the land" is inherited, won, stolen, etc.

    Could a native be more specific, please (I feel I don't explain well enough)?

    ~~ edit
    Thanks etangledbank!
    I wrote my lines without having seen yours: that's what I had in mind!
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I'm not sure that it is more formal than purchase (buy is perhaps a less formal word than purchase, so purchase is not particularly informal). The main point is that if you acquire something it comes into your possession by whatever means. It is used for abilities (such as a speaking a language) as well as material property.
     

    GerardM

    Senior Member
    French
    Thanks Matching_Mole!

    As far as I know, "purchase" is very common in American English (I'd say more common than buy), more frequent than in British English.
     
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