I already finished the work

< Previous | Next >

TroubleEnglish

Senior Member
Russian
I have such a rule in my head that if we have "already", "still" or "yet" I am obliged to use Perfect Tenses.

But can these words be used in Past Simple or Past Continuous?

I already finished the work (some time in Past, not now)

I didn't learn English yet (some time in Past, not now)

I was still learning English.

And difference will be with:

I had already finished the work

I hadn't learned English yet

I had been still learning English
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    1. I already finished the work
    2. I didn't learn English yet
    3. I was still learning English.
    4. I had already finished the work
    5. I hadn't learned English yet
    6. I had been still learning English
    In US English, #1 and #3-5 are indisputably correct. #6 needs "still" between "had" and "been"; otherwise it's correct. #2 I personally wouldn't say, I don't think, but I can't say it's never said by native speakers.
     

    TroubleEnglish

    Senior Member
    Russian
    1. I already finished the work
    2. I didn't learn English yet
    3. I was still learning English.
    4. I had already finished the work
    5. I hadn't learned English yet
    6. I had been still learning English
    In US English, #1 and #3-5 are indisputably correct. #6 needs "still" between "had" and "been"; otherwise it's correct. #2 I personally wouldn't say, I don't think, but I can't say it's never said by native speakers.
    Then we have such examples:

    We hadn't arrived at the station yet when I already finished the work

    We hadn't arrived at the station yet when I had already finished the work

    How can you comment them?
     

    TroubleEnglish

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Neither of those works for me.
    What about this:

    We hadn't arrived at the station yet when I had already finished the work by the morning

    We can see it like this:

    (We hadn't arrived at the station yet) (when I had already finished the work by the morning)

    It's like

    We hadn't arrived at the station by the morning

    But in "by the morning" we have "when I had already finished the work by the morning"

    "Hadn't arrived" happened before "when I had already finished"

    "when I had already finished" happened before "by the morning"

    Do you see my logic?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1 "I already finished the work" is not standard in UK (British) English. I don't hear it from the people around me, and I don't use it.
    2. "I didn't learn English yet": Might be possible in British English if the intended meaning is: "At that time (in the past) I wasn't learning English; I started learning it later." But in BrE it would be more normal to express that idea by "I wasn't yet learning English."
    3. "I was still learning English":thumbsup:: Fine in BrE.
    4. "I had already finished the work":thumbsup:: Fine in BrE.
    5. "I hadn't learned English yet": The tense is OK, but I would say "I hadn't yet learned any English."
    6. "I had been still learning English": The word order is odd. "I had still been learning English" seems grammatical, but I can't think of a situation in which I would prefer it to "I was still learning English."
     

    TroubleEnglish

    Senior Member
    Russian
    2. "I didn't learn English yet": Might be possible in British English if the intended meaning is: "At that time (in the past) I wasn't learning English; I started
    No, here I meant exactly the perfective meaning like "did"("learned) and not "was doing"("was learning")

    4. "I had already finished the work":thumbsup:: Fine in BrE.
    But how can it be used if the moment before which the word had been done isn't mentioned?

    Then my original sentence should be just incredibly perfectly correct.

    We hadn't arrived at the station yet when I had already finished the work

    Here I mean

    We hadn't (had) arrived at the station yet when I had already finished the work

    But if we don't have Past Past Perfect, then just Past Perfect is used in both.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    None of these work as standalone sentences or ideas. The sentences have to have more words or be a direct response to a previous sentence.
    1. I already finished the work so that's why I've come back early.
    2. I didn't learn English yet:thumbsdown: (I hadn't yet learned English so I was afraid to talk to you.)
    3. Why didn't you talk to me when we first met? I was still learning English and I was nervous.
    4. I had already finished the work when they asked for changes to the design.
    5. I hadn't learned English yet (see number 2)
    6. I had been still learning English:thumbsdown:
     

    TroubleEnglish

    Senior Member
    Russian
    None of these work as standalone sentences or ideas. The sentences have to have more words or be a direct response to a previous sentence.
    1. I already finished the work so that's why I've come back early.
    2. I didn't learn English yet:thumbsdown: (I hadn't yet learned English so I was afraid to talk to you.)
    3. Why didn't you talk to me when we first met? I was still learning English and I was nervous.
    4. I had already finished the work when they asked for changes to the design.
    5. I hadn't learned English yet (see number 2)
    6. I had been still learning English:thumbsdown:
    I meant if we could use "still", "already", "yet" not in Perfect Tenses but in Past Continous\Past Simple. Or if we have these words it will always be one of the Perfect Tenses?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top