I (already) work on my project (for) a month.

loviii

Senior Member
russian
Good day!

Context of my own example: I started to work on my project a month ago. I say:
(1) I work on my project for a month.
(2) I already work on my project for a month.

a) Are they correct and if not, then why?
b) Can I omit "for"?

Thanks!
 
  • loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    I have already worked on...
    I've already been working on...
    As opposed to Present Simple, Present Perfect doesn't give us the exact answer if "the working on the project" is still going on or already not. Hence these variants are different from those with Present Simple. Could you comment this somehow please?

    Thanks!
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    As opposed to Present Simple, Present Perfect doesn't give us the exact answer if "the working on the project" is still going on or already not. Hence these variants are different from those with Present Simple. Could you comment this somehow please?

    Thanks!
    The present simple doesn't work in English (in contrast to many European languages) to describe actions that have begun in the past and that have continued up to or through the present moment. The implication is that you have worked on it until the moment you speak; whether you will be working on it five seconds from now isn't something we consider.

    Sentences like "I work on my project for a month" are immediately diagnostic of a non-native speaker.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I started to work on my project a month ago. I say:
    (1) I work on my project for a month.
    (2) I already work on my project for a month.
    Why are you using the present tense for something that happened, or has been happening, in the past?
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    The present simple doesn't work in English (in contrast to many European languages) to describe actions that have begun in the past and that have continued up to or through the present moment.
    "I work on my project every day" - Here Present Simple describes the action that was before now, is now and will most likely be after now. Why is this example not compatible with your explanation of Present Simple?

    Thanks!

    Why are you using the present tense for something that happened, or has been happening, in the past?
    "I work on my project every day"
    "What do you do?" "I work on my project"
    are the examples where we are talking about Present, also including Past and Future.

    Am I wrong?

    Thanks!
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    "I work on my project every day" - Here Present Simple describes the action that was before now, is now and will most likely be after now. Why is this example not compatible with your explanation of Present Simple?


    "I work on my project every day"
    "What do you do?" "I work on my project"
    are the examples where we are talking about Present, also including Past and Future.
    These are habitual, periodic actions - a normal use of the simple present.

    (1) I work on my project for a month.
    (2) I already work on my project for a month.
    These are not, unless you mean something like:

    I work on my project for a month. Then I stop working. At some later time I again work on it for a month, and then stop.

    "You should work on your project for at least a month."
    "I already work on my project for a month."
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    habitual, periodic actions - a normal use of the simple present
    As I understand your examples are tied with this use of the simple present too. And to make them clear for myself I've tried to examine them:

    1)
    I work on my project for a month. Then I stop working. At some later time I again work on it for a month, and then stop.
    A: How do you usually allocate your time when you do your own project?
    B: I work on my project for a month. Then I stop working. At some later time I again work on it for a month, and then stop.

    I understand it.

    2)
    "You should work on your project for at least a month."
    "I already work on my project for a month."
    But I can't understand what idea you put in this example. I don't see any habits or periodic actions here. So how does it differ from the one but with Present Perfect?:
    A: You should work on your project for at least a month.
    B: I have already worked on my project for a month.

    Thanks!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "I work on my project every day"
    "What do you do?" "I work on my project"
    are the examples where we are talking about Present, also including Past and Future.
    But those have nothing to do with
    I started [past tense] to work on my project a month ago.
    What have you been doing for the last month? You have been working - You have worked...
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    But those have nothing to do with
    I started [past tense] to work on my project a month ago.
    Yes, it has nothing to do with
    I started to work on my project a month ago.
    Because in this sentence we speak about the point of the beginning of the work, not about the work as a process.

    What have you been doing for the last month? You have been working - You have worked...
    But this pattern doesn't touch on the present, only the past.

    And my attempt
    I (already) work on my project for a month.
    touches on both the present and the past.

    "I work on my project every day"
    "What do you do?" "I work on my project"
    are the examples where we are talking about Present, also including Past and Future.
    I thought "where" clause helped us to specify these examples
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    You should work on your project for at least a month.
    I already work on my project for a month
    .
    You wrote it means:
    You should do X.
    I am already in the habit of doing X.
    I would have understood it if you had used the plural form of "project", like:
    You should work on your projects for at least a month per one.
    I already work on my projects for a month per one.


    But as you wrote, I can't understand that your meaning is the same as mine above.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would have understood it if you had used the plural form of "project", like:
    You should work on your projects for at least a month per one.
    I already work on my projects for a month per one.


    But as you wrote, I can't understand that your meaning is the same as mine above.
    You used "project" in the OP; I used "project" in my answer. There was nothing to indicate that you had more than one project.

    "A month per one" makes no sense.
     
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