I always drive by/ pass by / drive past B to the my office (C).

hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
My location is at A, while location of my office is at C. A is the starting point whereas C is the destination.


A------------------------B-----------------------------------C

I want to say,

Can I say like this,

I always drive by/ pass by / drive past B to the my office (C).
 
  • MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    To me, you can use either:
    go by or go past or pass by or drive by or drive past
    here.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    You could say any of those three, but the context needs to be clear about what precisely is meant.

    "Drive past" indicates that you literally drove past B on the way to your office.

    "Pass by" can be the same as the above and could include walking or jogging as well as driving.

    If a friend wants you to visit them at B on the way to your office, they could say:

    "Could you pass by my place (B) and pick up a parcel I have for you." - here "pass by" means visit, ie you visit B.


    Personally, I would avoid using "drive by" in the above contexts. It has a strongly negative association eg "He was murdered in a drive-by shooting."
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    For all it's worth, I personally say swing by, which is one and the same.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    And it would be ' . . . on my way to the office'
    Indeed, or "on the way to my office."
    Also good are "on my way to my office" and on the way to the office".

    But note that "to the my office" (as in #1 and as in the thread title) is wrong. You can use "the" or "my", but not both together, and you can't omit both either.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Indeed, or "on the way to my office."
    Also good are "on my way to my office" and on the way to the office".

    But note that "to the my office" (as in #1 and as in the thread title) is wrong. You can use "the" or "my", but not both together, and you can't omit both either.
    You guys are trying to help, but In this statement, I doubt if anyone could figure out, that I am talking about B.

    what are you trying to say?
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    That you can't say to office.

    What are you looking for, hectacon? Is it, "There's B on my way to the office."?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    What is your interest in, or intention towards, B? Are you stopping there for some purpose (such as to deliver or pick up something or to visit someone or simply to look at B, or to have a coffee)?
    The choice of verb (drive, pass, go, drop swing) depends on what (if anything) you do there.
    Or are you simply saying that your route happens to go past B? Can you be more specific and give an example of B instead of just calling it "B"?
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    What is your interest in, or intention towards, B? Are you stopping there for some purpose (such as to deliver or pick up something or to visit someone or simply to look at B, or to have a coffee)?
    The choice of verb (drive, pass, go, drop swing) depends on what (if anything) you do there.
    Or are you simply saying that your route happens to go past B? Can you be more specific and give an example of B instead of just calling it "B"?
    I already have got the answer for OP.

    I want help on this OP. I want to tell someone that B's place is in the same route to my office.

    I get B on my way to office(c)
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you drive past B's place, then you could say 'I drive past B's place on my way to the office'. Or ' . . . on the way to my office'.

    If you walk, then 'I walk past B's place . . . '

    Or, less specifically, 'I go past B's place . . . '.
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    There's B on my way to the office.

    B's located/situated on the exact way I'm taking when going to my office.
     
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