I always drive by/ pass by / drive past B to the my office (C).

hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
My location is at A, while location of my office is at C. A is the starting point whereas C is the destination.


A------------------------B-----------------------------------C

I want to say,

Can I say like this,

I always drive by/ pass by / drive past B to the my office (C).
 
  • MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    To me, you can use either:
    go by or go past or pass by or drive by or drive past
    here.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    You could say any of those three, but the context needs to be clear about what precisely is meant.

    "Drive past" indicates that you literally drove past B on the way to your office.

    "Pass by" can be the same as the above and could include walking or jogging as well as driving.

    If a friend wants you to visit them at B on the way to your office, they could say:

    "Could you pass by my place (B) and pick up a parcel I have for you." - here "pass by" means visit, ie you visit B.


    Personally, I would avoid using "drive by" in the above contexts. It has a strongly negative association eg "He was murdered in a drive-by shooting."
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    For all it's worth, I personally say swing by, which is one and the same.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    And it would be ' . . . on my way to the office'
    Indeed, or "on the way to my office."
    Also good are "on my way to my office" and on the way to the office".

    But note that "to the my office" (as in #1 and as in the thread title) is wrong. You can use "the" or "my", but not both together, and you can't omit both either.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Indeed, or "on the way to my office."
    Also good are "on my way to my office" and on the way to the office".

    But note that "to the my office" (as in #1 and as in the thread title) is wrong. You can use "the" or "my", but not both together, and you can't omit both either.
    You guys are trying to help, but In this statement, I doubt if anyone could figure out, that I am talking about B.

    what are you trying to say?
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    That you can't say to office.

    What are you looking for, hectacon? Is it, "There's B on my way to the office."?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    What is your interest in, or intention towards, B? Are you stopping there for some purpose (such as to deliver or pick up something or to visit someone or simply to look at B, or to have a coffee)?
    The choice of verb (drive, pass, go, drop swing) depends on what (if anything) you do there.
    Or are you simply saying that your route happens to go past B? Can you be more specific and give an example of B instead of just calling it "B"?
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    What is your interest in, or intention towards, B? Are you stopping there for some purpose (such as to deliver or pick up something or to visit someone or simply to look at B, or to have a coffee)?
    The choice of verb (drive, pass, go, drop swing) depends on what (if anything) you do there.
    Or are you simply saying that your route happens to go past B? Can you be more specific and give an example of B instead of just calling it "B"?
    I already have got the answer for OP.

    I want help on this OP. I want to tell someone that B's place is in the same route to my office.

    I get B on my way to office(c)
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you drive past B's place, then you could say 'I drive past B's place on my way to the office'. Or ' . . . on the way to my office'.

    If you walk, then 'I walk past B's place . . . '

    Or, less specifically, 'I go past B's place . . . '.
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    There's B on my way to the office.

    B's located/situated on the exact way I'm taking when going to my office.
     

    Ashraful Haque

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    I have two questions:
    1) Does drive past and drive by mean exactly the same thing?
    2) Is drive past only used in the past tense? I mean, can I say 'I get scared every time I drive past this house' vs 'I used to get scared every time I drive past this house'
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Is drive past only used in the past tense?
    Why would you think that? I hope it isn't because it contains the word "past".
    To drive past a place simply means that you pass that place while you happen to be driving.
    "Drive past" is never used in the past tense. The past tense would be "drove past".
    I mean, can I say 'I get scared every time I drive past this house'
    Yes, you can, and you should.
    vs 'I used to get scared every time I drive past this house'
    That would be wrong. It needs "drove".
     

    Ashraful Haque

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    Why would you think that? I hope it isn't because it contains the word "past".
    To drive past a place simply means that you pass that place while you happen to be driving.
    "Drive past" is never used in the past tense. The past tense would be "drove past".
    Yes, you can, and you should.

    That would be wrong. It needs "drove".
    Thank you very much. That was exactly my problem. So the past tense of 'drive past' is 'drove past'.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm going to drive by / drive past the park, because it's more scenic that way. (Not stopping. Either can be used.)
    I'm going to drive by the store and pick up some eggs. (Stopping) :tick:
    I'm going to drive past the store and pick up some eggs. (Stopping) :cross:

    In response to:
    I'm sorry I couldn't find the AmE post you were talking about. Is it different is AmE?
    london calling has quoted British English speaker Linkway's personal feeling and assumed that it must be standard American English because fellow British English speaker PaulQ disagrees with him.

    Let me assure you that we Americans drive by places all the time without shooting.
     

    Ashraful Haque

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    I'm going to drive by / drive past the park, because it's more scenic that way. (Not stopping. Either can be used.)
    I'm going to drive by the store and pick up some eggs. (Stopping) :tick:
    I'm going to drive past the store and pick up some eggs. (Stopping) :cross:
    Pretty confusing! If 'drive by' means to drive past something(store) and leaving the store behind, then how can the driver pick up eggs from the store?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's confusing that you have two phrases that mean exactly the same thing. I thought there were no perfect synonyms? ;)
    I learnt the US usage on one of my several trips to the US, when my friend said she 'drove by the store to pick up some beer'. Of course, I understood what she meant, she stopped off to buy some beer, but that's not what 'drive by' means in BE.:)
     

    Ashraful Haque

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    Because it doesn't mean "drive past". Not confusing at all.
    So 'drive by' can man both 'drive past,' meaning without stopping walking/your car and also stop somewhere to do something?
    Is it possible to say, "I'll drop by while driving by your place?"
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So 'drive by' can man both 'drive past,' meaning without stopping walking/your car and also stop somewhere to do something?
    Is it possible to say, "I'll drop by while driving by your place?"
    It can, but only in AmE. No, that doesn't work, but you could say "If I drive by your place, I'll drop in."
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    So 'drive by' can man both 'drive past,' meaning without stopping walking/your car and also stop somewhere to do something?
    Not in BE. We say 'stop off'. 'Drive past/drive by' mean the same thing, as I said above.

    I stopped off to buy some beer.
    I stopped off at the doctor's to make an appointment.
    I stopped off at John's to wish him happy birthday.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top