I am a bit headache.

Thinkpad

Senior Member
Thai
Is this grammatically correct?

"I am a bit headache."

I think that it should be incorrect, because 'headache' is a noun. But, I see it so often.

(But, I never see "I am headache" meaning "I have a headache.")

Thanks in advance.:)
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    You are right that it is incorrect, at least in the English I am familiar with.

    Where do you see or hear it? Could you describe a conversation in which you have heard it used?

    Is it possible that you misheard it?
     

    Thinkpad

    Senior Member
    Thai
    Thanks a lot :D.

    I usually see it in a conversation like this.

    Are you OK?

    "Yes, but I'm a bit headache." Or "Yes, I am, just a bit headache."

    So, the correct one should be like this, shouldn't it?

    "Yes, but I have a bit headache." Or "Yes, I am, just have a bit headache."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, but I have a bit of a headache.
    Yes, but I have just a bit of a headache.
    Yes, I am... just a bit of a headache.
     

    Thinkpad

    Senior Member
    Thai
    Thanks!!! :D

    May I ask why we should use "have just a bit of a headache" instead of "just have a bit of a headache"?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It changes the meaning slightly (for me, when I'm thinking about it):
    Are you fine? Yes, I just have a bit of a headache. (Here, I only have a small headache.)
    Are you fine? Yes, I have just a bit of a headache. (Here, "just" and "bit of" both modify "headache," so there's no only as above, and the headache is even smaller.)

    In the real world, however, both are pretty similar.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To be a headache is a perfectly normal idiom in BE, but it's got nothing to do with having a headache. I am a headache is on the same lines as I'm a pain in the arse; it means you are a source of trouble or worry to other people. People don't often say it of themselves.

    More often you use the expression to refer to particular worries, rather than people, e.g. This new contract is a headache.
     

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    I'm almost sure I've heard, 'I'm feeling a bit headachy'. I've never seen it written. It would be very informal.
     
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