I am a teacher of Class 7

Roymalika

Senior Member
Punjabi
I teach Class 7 in a school.
Can I say, "I am a teacher of Class 7"?

(I think it's Grade 7 in other countries.)
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Are you asking about
    - the word class/grade or
    - the word “a” or
    - the word “of” or
    - something else?
    Of course, all of these are debatable: there are potential alternatives, depending.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    Are you asking about
    - the word class/grade or
    - the word “a” or
    - the word “of” or
    - something else?
    Of course, all of these are debatable: there are potential alternatives, depending.
    I'm asking about the whole sentence.

    In schools here, different teachers are allotted different classes to teach. I have been allotted Class 7 to teach. So I am the only tecaher who teaches Class 7.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    As pointed out above, in the U.S. we would most likely say: I teach seventh grade or I'm a seventh-grade teacher.
    If you say "Class 7" instead of "seventh grade," I would suggest:
    I teach Class 7 or I'm a Class 7 teacher.

    If you are speaking specifically about your school, where you are the only Class 7 teacher, you would say:
    I'm the Class 7 teacher (instead of "a").
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    In schools here, different teachers are allotted different classes to teach. I have been allotted Class 7 to teach. So I am the only tecaher who teaches Class 7.
    You teach all subjects to that one class? We typically have specialist teachers for each subject. It must get really boring both for the pupils (if they only ever see one teacher all day every day) and also for the teachers (if they only teach one class all day every day).

    Are you sure that by "class 7" you don't mean classroom 7?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes. But does that matter?
    Yes, because a classroom is not the same thing as a class. A class is a collection of pupils who attend lessons together.
    In some systems it is normal for a class always to remain in the same classroom, and different teachers come in to teach them different subjects.
    In some systems, teachers are always in the same classroom, and the pupils go from room to room for their various subjects.

    If your number 7 is not the number of the room, we would tend to assume it's the year-number of the class. In very large schools there might be several year-7 classes, so "class 7" would not be unique. In smaller schools it would be unique.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In BE it would be I'm the teacher for Year 7 (assuming Year 7 only had the one teacher, which since they're 11 year-olds would be unlikely in most British schools).
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It may be understood, but I wouldn’t call it “acceptable” as it’s not idiomatic in my opinion. I can’t imagine a native speaker saying it.
    The reason no-one would say it is that the very idea of that level of specialization is absurd. No-one teaches 7th grade and nothing but 7th grade.
    It's like a clarinettist specialising in playing only G-sharp.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    No, that has nothing to do with it. It’s simply not idiomatic.

    I teach seventh grade. :tick:
    I’m a seventh grade teacher. :tick:
    I’m a teacher of seventh grade. :thumbsdown:

    Whether or not you teach only seventh grade is irrelevant.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    So depending on whether you teach the students who work in Classroom 7, or you teach students of the 7th grade (which I find odd), we can formulate different sentences. So I assume you teach in the system where students go from class to class then? In the case of working in class 7, you could say:
    - "I teach from Classroom 7. (For the sake of brevity, I'm going to omit room; obviously we could use it with or without said termination, but I believe it sounds much better to speak about Classroom 7. As has happened previously, we weren't sure whether you were talking about Year 7, a specific group of students, as in Class 7A or 7B. In retrospect, it would probably have been shorter to just say not omit room, but I felt like I needed to explain myself.)
    - "I give class to the students in Class 7/I teach the students in Class 7"
    - For a broader explanation ,you could just say "I'm in Class 7". I am unaware of how your specific system functions, but some schools have the teachers in a different class every day, in which case you can add the date you want to the sentence: "I'm in Class 7 on Mondays, Wednesdays, etc.

    Hope this helped. I haven't been on here in over half a year, it's nice to see it hasn't changed much. Bit off-topic here, but I really used to enjoy sepnding time here. Wish I could spare some more :)
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    These sound highly unidiomatic to me (US English).
    Yes, they can sound a bit stiff; I was thinking along the lines of more formal conversation. A (maybe) more casual way of saying it could be: "I teach in Classroom 7." (South Eastern England, but also a bit of a wally at times:p)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Nope, not stiff, not formal, they just wouldn't be said in US English.

    I teach in Classroom 7. :tick:
    I teach the students in Classroom 7. :tick:
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Yes, I suppose I might have been a bit off on those.
    I teach from Classroom 7.
    This one's just completely wrong, my bad here. At a stretch, it could be used to speak about giving webinars, online lessons and such from a designated classroom for that matter, but it's highly unlikely and way too specific.

    The second one, however, I do not believe is wrong grammatically, although I will agree it can sound unnatural.
    I give class to the students in Class 7.
    I teach the students in Classroom 7. :tick:
    Should have said that in the first place, shouldn't I? :p
     
    Top