I am addicted to cigarettes......

claude23

Banned
FRANCE
Hi,

Is that the right way of saying it ? I mean I am addicted to cigarettes .. that means I keep on smoking and I can't get rid of it.. I like it.


Thank you,

Claude.
 
  • Lancearoni

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Also when speaking about addictions, people will sometimes refer to it as "having a monkey on their back"

    for example,

    "I've been smoking for so long, I don't know that I'll ever get the monkey off my back"
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I don't think I've ever heard "monkey on my back" in actual speech.

    A slang term for an addiction, or craving, is a "jones" and to be craving whatever you are addicted to is "jonesing".

    I'm jonesing for a cigarette right now.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    ewhite said:
    A slang term for an addiction, or craving, is a "jones" and to be craving whatever you are addicted to is "jonesing".
    I think there is a pretty big distinction between "addiction," and "craving" and/or "jones."

    "I'm jonesing for a cigarette," is synonymous with "I'm craving a cigarette." While "to jones" speaks to the greater part of one's addition, from a language standpoint, one cannot subsitute the word "jones" for "addiction," or "addicted."

    For example, we cannot say:

    I'm jonesed to cigarettes as a substitute for I'm addicted to cigarettes.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I've never heard of jonesing.
    But I have been in hospital wards full of dying smokers who really, really wished they could have a chance to relive those decisions.

    Oops, sorry, getting off the stump...

    Yes, it is correct to say, "I am addicted to cigarettes."
    It is a clinical condition - physical and psychological - and a genuine addiction.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Could "Jonesing" be a Bridget-related neologism - didn't she mark her diary with her daily consumption (bad 'lung-related pun' there) figures?
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    claude23 said:
    Hi,

    Is that the right way of saying it ? I mean I am addicted to cigarettes .. that means I keep on smoking and I can't get rid of it.. I like it.


    Thank you,

    Claude.
    You can also say:" I'm addicted to smoking."
     

    Canela_am

    Member
    the Netherlands, Dutch
    Or:
    i´ve got a nicotine habit.

    But that could also mean you like eat those chewing-gums with nicotine.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    maxiogee said:
    Could "Jonesing" be a Bridget-related neologism - didn't she mark her diary with her daily consumption (bad 'lung-related pun' there) figures?

    Interesting point:thumbsup: can someone else confirm this please?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    The only reference to its origin which I can find on UrbanDictionary says that it comes from "keeping up with the Joneses" but that is so implausible. What does having a craving for anything have to do with that concept?
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    maxiogee said:
    Could "Jonesing" be a Bridget-related neologism - didn't she mark her diary with her daily consumption (bad 'lung-related pun' there) figures?
    It's a possibility, but one I highly doubt. I seem to recall having used "jones" (I no longer smoke) long before the Bridget Jones phenomenon.

    It's reserved for those moments when the quivers are starting to set in and you about to pull out all of your hair for your next fix....when the craving is really overwhelming.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I thought I might as well have a look in the OED.

    jones (n) A drug addict's habit; symptoms of withdrawal from heroin or other drug; any intense craving or desire.

    jones (v) To experience the symptoms of withdrawal from heroin; (later also) to feel a physical craving for any addictive substance. (US slang).
    The earliest reference is 1965.

    No etymology is given, but there is a suggested link with yen, derived from the Cantonese yan (craving).
     
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