I am <eating, having> breakfast ...

duden

Senior Member
Slovak
Hi, is it possible to write

"I am eating breakfast just now."
instead of
"I am having breakfast just now." ?

I mean is there no need of adding "my" before the "breakfast" in connection with the verb eat?

Thank you
 
  • Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    Hi, is it possible to write

    "I am eating breakfast just now."
    instead of
    "I am having breakfast just now." ?Both are fine: 'eating' probably more common in the U.S.

    I mean is there no need of adding "my" before the "breakfast" in connection with the verb eat? No need, unless there is a chance you're eating someone else's breakfast.

    Thank you
    My favorite breakfast is eggs Benedict.
     

    maru2206

    New Member
    spanish
    I agree with Tabac,

    Both are fine. "eating" is also used in England, although "having" is more common.

    Therefore,
    You can "eat" or "have" breakfast.
    You can even "cook" breakfast before eating it...
     

    melimelo

    New Member
    English, UK
    Although "my" isn't obligatory, I would say it is possible -

    I'm having my breakfast right now

    I'm going to go and have my breakfast.

    These sound acceptable to me, what does anyone else think?
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    Although "my" isn't obligatory, I would say it is possible -

    I'm having my breakfast right now

    I'm going to go and have my breakfast.

    These sound acceptable to me, what does anyone else think?
    Grammatically acceptable? Yes, but the word "my" seems unneccessary. Unless you specify that you are eating someone else's breakfast, it would be assumed that you are eating your own breakfast.
     

    pyan

    Senior Member
    English, UK, London
    The original question was "eating or having". Both are fine in British English.

    Grammatically acceptable? Yes, but the word "my" seems unneccessary. Unless you specify that you are eating someone else's breakfast, it would be assumed that you are eating your own breakfast.
    After muttering the two versions to myself for a few minutes. I come down firmly in favour of "my breakfast", pronounced "m' breakfast."

    "I'm having breakfast" (right now or just now) sounds a bit formal and stuffy to me. In spite of several tries I can't explain this.
     

    winklepicker

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    Although "my" isn't obligatory, I would say it is possible -

    I'm having my breakfast right now

    I'm going to go and have my breakfast.

    These sound acceptable to me, what does anyone else think?
    Yes - it looks like another AE/BE thing as posts from this side of the Atlantic seem to prefer my breakfast (as do I).
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Yes - it looks like another AE/BE thing as posts from this side of the Atlantic seem to prefer my breakfast (as do I).
    The sentences sound fine to me with and with "my". My father and all his relatives were English or Welsh. My mother and all her relatives were American. ;)

    Gaer
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I don't mind the "my," but I like it better with "have" than with "eat." Don't really know why.
     

    bellerophon

    Member
    English - Canada
    "I am eating breakfast just now."
    instead of
    "I am having breakfast just now." ?

    I think the "my" debate has been put to rest, but I wanted to mention that if you're using the progressive tense "am eating" you wouldn't bother indicating that it's happening "just now".

    "I'm eating breakfast" and "I'm having breakfast" both imply that the breakfast is going down the tube as we speak.

    cheers
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Not necessarily. It depends on the context.

    -What are you doing tomorrow morning?
    -I'm having breakfast with my dad.

    "Right now" can be used for emphasis. It's quite common in casual spoken English.

    Welcome to the forums! :)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Not necessarily. It depends on the context.

    -What are you doing tomorrow morning?
    -I'm having breakfast with my dad.
    I think that's cheating a bit. :)

    You are providing context with the first sentence and following it with a tense used informally that replaces what would really be correct:

    -What are you doing tomorrow morning?
    -I'm going to have [gonna have] breakfast with my dad.

    But I agree that what you wrote is very common in speech, and I would use it myself. ;)

    Gaer
     
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