I am having a party.

< Previous | Next >

HyeeWang

Senior Member
Chinese
--- I am having a party for my sister's birthday (this weekday). And it has a jungle theme.

It is a dialogue in a English teaching programme. what does "having" mean there? Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    This is meaning #9 in the Word Reference dictionary definition of have:
    organize or be responsible for; [ ...] "have, throw, or make a party"
    (Actually, I am not likely to say "make a party". Perhaps someone else says it this way. I would say "have a party" or "give a party". I might say "throw a party", but this is more casual.)
     

    jonmaz

    Senior Member
    English-Australia
    I am having a party for my birthday means that there is to be a party for my birthday.

    I am having a party for my sister's birthday probably means I am organising a party for her birthday.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    What is the context? Do you mean it as simple present or future?
    The same context as was discussed - a planned action in the future (one-off event)

    I have a party for my sister's birthday this Sunday. (usually it's I am having...)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I have a party for my sister's birthday this Sunday.
    I could not say that if I wished to announce the party and wanted my listener to take the news as an invitation. In other words, it is not, in my usage, an alternative to "I'm having a party for my sister's birthday this Sunday."

    You could, however, use the simple present in "I can't play golf on Sunday. I have a party to attend", for example. That's a different meaning of "have", of course.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    No, I meant simple present bananas or future oranges. ;) In #11, you say it is future.
    You should differentiate between physical time and the names of tenses. The present simple is called present but it can convey actions in the future (physical dimension).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You should differentiate between physical time and the names of tenses. The present simple is called present but it can convey actions in the future (physical dimension).
    You should use words the way they are commonly used in English. What "physical time" is "simple present"? By that definition, there is no future tense in English - English only has present and past morphologically.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    You should use words the way they are commonly used in English. What "physical time" is "simple present"? By that definition, there is no future tense in English - English only has present and past morphologically.
    Well, there is no future tense, as some say, in English, but that doesn't mean there is no future time and the future time can be expressed by the present simple.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top