I am here to help make all your dreams come true

Rednails

Senior Member
English-British
Hi can anyone help me with a story I'm writing in Portuguese?
This is what I am trying to say:
“Don’t be afraid!” said a voice.” I am your fairy God mother and I am here to help make all your dreams come true!”
Can anyone tell me the correct translation for "make all your dreams come true"
"Nao estas com medo!" dizui um voz. "“Sou a tinha "fairy godmother" e estou aqui para ajudar (make your dreams come true)"

I’m not sure if my translation makes sense, but any help you could give me would be great.

Thank you!
 
  • Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Não te asustes! - disse uma voz. - Sou a tua fada madrinha e estou aqui para fazer os teus sonhos se tornarem realidade.

    The negative imperative in most Romance languages is morphologically identical to the conjunctive mood, so here.
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    “Don’t be afraid!” said a voice.” I am your fairy God mother and I am here to help make all your dreams come true!”
    Can anyone tell me the correct translation for "make all your dreams come true"
    "Nao estas com medo!" dizui um voz. "“Sou a tinha "fairy godmother" e estou aqui para ajudar (make your dreams come true)"

    I’m not sure if my translation makes sense, but any help you could give me would be great.

    Thank you!
    "Não tenha medo!" disse uma voz. "Eu sou sua fada madrinha e estou aqui para ajudá-la a tornar seus sonhos em realidade!"


    Por falar nisso, o que está mais certo: tornar sonhos em realidade ou tornar sonhos realidade ?
     
    Last edited:

    Snipy

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Não te asustes! - disse uma voz. - Sou a tua fada madrinha e estou aqui para fazer os teus sonhos se tornarem realidade.

    The negative imperative in most Romance languages is morphologically identical to the conjunctive mood, so here.
    I am not a native speaker, but this version looks kinda like Portuguese from Portugal, am I wrong?
    I would have written, for the Brazilian version:

    Não se assuste! - disse uma voz. - Sou a sua fada madrinha e estou aqui para fazer os seus sonhos se tornarem realidade.
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Yes, I generally prefer European Portuguese, although I miss the estar + gerúndio construction there.
    And again, my Portuguese is heavily influenced by Spanish (you see it in Não te asustes), as it is the language through which I got to understand written (I am reading contemporary Portuguese literature) and, to some degree, spoken Portuguese (though I haven't had the opportunity to converse with Portuguese people, only with Brasilians).

    Little OT. Italian knows both constructions: sto facendo / sto a fare, although in my perception they are not quite identical and the second is use less often.
     

    Snipy

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Yes, I generally prefer European Portuguese, although I miss the estar + gerúndio construction there.
    And again, my Portuguese is heavily influenced by Spanish (you see it in Não te asustes), as it is the language through which I got to understand written (I am reading contemporary Portuguese literature) and, to some degree, spoken Portuguese (though I haven't had the opportunity to converse with Portuguese people, only with Brasilians).

    Little OT. Italian knows both constructions: sto facendo / sto a fare, although in my perception they are not quite identical and the second is use less often.
    ot: 'sto a fare' is more commonly used in the south, it's not the correct way to speak, 'sto facendo' is the right one :) .
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    I've seen it written by Northern Italians and it does not look/sound quite false to my eyes/ears, just an alternative with a slightly different meaning...
     

    Snipy

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    I've seen it written by Northern Italians and it does not look/sound quite false to my eyes/ears, just an alternative with a slightly different meaning...
    The meaning is the same, but it's not the right way to speak.
    Northern Italians use it due to a massive immigration of Southern Italians to the north and a massive usage of it in Italian movies, you will never hear it in foreign movies dubbed in Italian because, as I said, is not correct.
     
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