I am I/me and you are you.

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  • BatMaster

    Member
    English - American (West)
    'I am me and you are you' is correct.

    It just so happens that both the subjective and objective case of 'you' in English are the same word.

    And it's natural enough - there's a certain colloquial/childish/playful tone about it, but I've certainly heard and said it myself before!
     
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    FurryOne

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    I am me and you are you sounds natural and colloquial.

    Some people might insist that it should be I am I and you are you but it sounds stilted and pedantic to me.

    The same thing occurs with It's me/I. Most people would say It's me. but the pedants would insist on It's I.

    The reason is that the verb to be is a linking verb, and linking verbs join two words in the nominative case. In a fully declined language, like Latin, a sentence like You are happy would have both the pronoun you and the complement happy in the nominative case. But English has only vestigial traces of these distinctions, in the personal pronouns. Most people don't know much about them, and simply say what sounds natural to their ear.
     

    Joca

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I am me and you are you sounds natural and colloquial.

    Some people might insist that it should be I am I and you are you but it sounds stilted and pedantic to me.

    The same thing occurs with It's me/I. Most people would say It's me. but the pedants would insist on It's I.

    The reason is that the verb to be is a linking verb, and linking verbs join two words in the nominative case. In a fully declined language, like Latin, a sentence like You are happy would have both the pronoun you and the complement happy in the nominative case. But English has only vestigial traces of these distinctions, in the personal pronouns. Most people don't know much about them, and simply say what sounds natural to their ear.
    Interesting... However, in the one song I was talking about (The Walrus), they say: I am he as you are he as you are me... rather than I am him as you are him as you are... Doesn't it look arbitrary?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's such an unnatural sentence that none of us would ever say it and actually know how to. 'I am I' is tempting for the obvious x = x sound, but normal English grammar makes 'I am me' more natural.

    Sometimes we vary the natural cases in order to make a point. So 'I saw myself in a mirror' is the ordinary way of saying it, but you might say, 'I saw me in a mirror' to emphasize that you felt you were looking at almost a different person.
     

    almufadado

    Senior Member
    Português de Portugal
    It's such an unnatural sentence that none of us would ever say it and actually know how to. 'I am I' is tempting for the obvious x = x sound, but normal English grammar makes 'I am me' more natural.

    Sometimes we vary the natural cases in order to make a point. So 'I saw myself in a mirror' is the ordinary way of saying it, but you might say, 'I saw me in a mirror' to emphasize that you felt you were looking at almost a different person.
    Depends on context and intent:

    "After the surgery, I finally can see me, the old me, in the mirror again ! Seems like a rebirth ! I am "I" again ! " ARR Almufadado 2009

    In my opinion, it sounds correct and perceivable as oppose to the unchangeable truth that "When I look in the mirror I always see me" and "I am me".

    This type of sentence/construction that has a clear hint of poetry, because in normal terms and day to day life one does not go out stating the obvious.

    Also (... constructing ...):
    "I can see myself in the mirror because I am not blind"-> "I can see me, the real me I am not fooling myself" -> "When I look at the "I" I was, (sniff) I ask me where and when has the poetry of life gone out of me " (sniff, sniff :) )

    "Sometimes, like in a outer body experience, when I look at me in the mirror, I see a stranger". (sniff)

    Just like in a two person situation:
    "- John, I am still your wife ! You don't look at me like you used to ! Can you still see the whole me ? "
     
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