I am learning the best way <of playing> cricket

pratikgaya10

Member
Hindi
I am learning the best way of playing cricket.
Is this sentence correct?. If Yes, Then how, since infinitive is used with learn verb.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "The best way of playing cricket" is a noun phrase, and "playing cricket" does not depend on the verb "learning".

    I am [learning to play] cricket. The catenative verb "learn" is followed directly by a to infinitive. But learn can also be followed by a noun phrase or noun clause:

    I am learning French/how to play cricket/the best way of playing cricket/the best way to play cricket.

    Both of these are used, but I think the version with the infinitive is more common:

    This is the best way to play cricket.
    This is
    the best way of playing cricket.




     

    pratikgaya10

    Member
    Hindi
    <Threads have been merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)>

    The best option is playing cricket or the best option is to play cricket.

    Which is right?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Praktikgaya's question presupposes that there is a "best way" to play cricket, or of playing cricket, but that is not a familiar concept to me.

    I am learning the best way to dance the tango.
    I am learning the best way of dancing the tango.


    If I say that, I must think that there is a "best way" of learning/to learn to dance, and perhaps there is. I'm guessing that the Argentinian way might be the best, but I can't dance the tango or play cricket. I can cook though :D.

    I'm teaching my daughter the best way to make a traditional Christmas Pudding (i.e. my way;)).

    If I heard someone talking about "someone learning the best way of making a Christmas Pudding" I would have no trouble with that phrasing, though I think the infinitive sounds more natural.
     
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