1. Alessandra_mtp Member

    France french
    Hello everyone

    I am wondering but does 'I am made up for you' mean?
    In a complicated situation, someone may say it to show his support to say that he'll be there for you?!
    I am bit confused... If anyone knows, please tell me

    Thank you
     
  2. harrythelm Senior Member

    USA English
    Il faudrait un peu de contexte. Sans contexte, cela pourrait vouloir dire : je me suis maquillée pour toi, je me suis mise sur mon trente-et-un pour toi.
     
  3. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    In a complicated situation, someone may say it to show his support to say that he'll be there for you?!

    I'm not sure of the relevance in this sentence but it usually means to be happy for someone.
     
  4. lentulax

    lentulax Senior Member

    Cumbria , England
    UK English
    :tick:

    As far as I know , it always means what livvie says - to be pleased that someone has been lucky , successful , is happy etc.

    Mike
     
  5. pyan

    pyan Senior Member

    Vendée, France
    English, UK, London
  6. Emillyb Member

    London
    UK English
  7. egremoq Senior Member

    England / English
    Nor have I - it sounds really dated!
     
  8. DrD

    DrD Senior Member

    Cantal, France
    England English
    It's not old fashioned and it does mean to be happy for someone. I think it originates from Liverpool, but, like many regional expressions, has become more widely used/understood in Britain. I would imagine it's not likely to mean much to English speakers from anywhere else in the world though!
     
  9. mally pense

    mally pense Senior Member

    Cheshire, England
    England, UK English
    Not dated at all, and in common use in this part of the world at least. I'm surprised it is apparently so little understood in some parts... if it's good enough for Southend despite its northern origins, surely it can't be all that alien or dated-sounding?

    http://www.southendunited.premiumtv.co.uk/page/YouthNewsDetail/0,,10444~1218329,00.html

    It's worth mentinoing the variations: made up with something and made up about something, or just made up on it's own.
     
  10. Language Geek

    Language Geek Senior Member

    London
    English (UK)
    I'm familiar with this expression too... and I'm in London!
     
  11. egremoq Senior Member

    England / English
    Sorry - it must be an age thing!
     
  12. DrD

    DrD Senior Member

    Cantal, France
    England English
    Maybe if you're a southerner, it just depends on the type of TV you watch. There have been so many northern-based drama series on over the last decade or so, that a lot of expressions from the north of England have passed into common parlance pretty much everywhere. Or maybe I just watch too much TV ;-)
     
  13. Emillyb Member

    London
    UK English
    Not a question of being 'good enough' for one or another person mally pense, just some have heard of it and others haven't. I agree that it sounds from people's comments that it's more a regional thing than time-related. But these discussions and discrepancies are interesting and useful. They build up a picture of where things are in common usage and how widespread they are.
     
  14. daddysgirl Member

    ENGLAND - ENGLISH
    Definitely means "I am really happy for you"

    Frances
     
  15. mally pense

    mally pense Senior Member

    Cheshire, England
    England, UK English
    Don't worry too much about my comment Emillyb, it was intended to be a little tongue-in-cheek, and I'm sure the discussions are useful, even those about the expression sounding old-fashioned, dated or somehow age-related. These, along with my own light-hearted 'defence', all help build up a picture of where the expression sits in the milieu of this language that calls itself English (as you so rightly say).

    Mally
     
  16. Topsie

    Topsie Senior Member

    Avignon, France
    English-UK
    I'm made for you = je suis fait(e) pour toi
    I'm all made up for you = je me suis maquillé(e) pour toi
    I'm made up for you (argot BE) = Je suis ravi(e) pour toi !
     
  17. entrepreneur73 New Member

    California
    English - but French in my heart...
    It is not connected with 'maquillage' or being ready or making a special effort in preparation for a meeting. It's also not new: I learned it first in north-west England in the late 60s/early 70s.

    "I'm made up" means "I'm having a really good day" or "Something just happened which makes me extremely happy".

    "I'm made up for you" means that I'm very happy for you (about what just happened to you, or about what you just told me).

    Examples "We heard on the radio that Liverpool won. We were made up!"
    "Des got his place at University. I was made up for him!"
     
  18. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    It is absolutely foreign to USE.
     

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