I am more flame-broiled than your hotdog

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by regal, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. regal Senior Member

    French
    What does this sentence mean ? I think it has something to do with homosexuality, but I'm not sure if it's derogatory or anything. And what does "frambroil" mean ? Like "grill" ?
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Sorry, I have never seen this word. However, since it mentions "hotdog" also, it could be an americanism. *shrug*
     
  3. konungursvia Banned

    Toronto
    Canada (English)
    Flame-broiled is a word, meaning cooked by a flame. The sentence given probably refers to being hot (uncomfortably hot) or is a euphemism for homosexuality (but this is not a standard expression). Being a "flaming homosexual" is more common, as is "being a flamer".
     
  4. regal Senior Member

    French
    Thanks to both of you.
    Yet, konungursvia, I am not sure I understand where the euphemism for homosexuality lies. Could you be more accurate please? Thanks a lot in advance.
    Enjoy your week,
    regal.
     
  5. broglet

    broglet Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    In England, flaming or flamer have nothing specifically to do with homosexuality. The word "flaming" can, however, be used to indicate annoyance or disapproval, eg "He's a flaming idiot!" Flame-broiled and broiled are American (not English) words. The English for broiled is grilled. None of these words are used as euphemisms for homosexuality in England, nor as euphemisms for anything else.
     
  6. Gez Senior Member

    French (France)
    Urban Dictionary has nothing for flame-broiled, and less than nothing for this erroneous spelling you saw.

    Given UD's thoroughness as far as sexual-themed slang goes, I think we can safely say being flame-broiled isn't a real idiom. It may mean something in the greater context of the whole text, but that would then be just because it continues the metaphore.
     
  7. regal Senior Member

    French
    Thanks everyone and enjoy your weekend!
     
  8. kats Senior Member

    USA
    English
    Was that the spelling used? Also, more context would be helpful. I can imagine it being used in an outdoor setting in summer where those with fair skin often get "flame-broiled."
    I don't know where the expression "flaming" for homosexuals comes from, but I always understood it in the sense of flamboyant, flashy. In this case, if your spelling was correct, it may be a play on words indicating homosexuality. Also, I would not call it a euphemism. It seems something of a stereotype.
    Just my take on it, for what it's worth.
     

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